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Dunbartonshire volume 03

Page List of names as written Various modes of spelling Authorities for spelling Situation Description remarks Continued entries/extra info Transcriber's notes
OS1/9/3/1 ARDMAY Ardmay Ardmay Ardmay Ardmay Ardmay Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar, Ph [Parish] Schoolmaster Valuation Roll Dugald McFarlan, Ardmay Mr. Martin, Factor 007 A small hamlet, comprised of two good cottages and a row of cottars' houses, on the side of Loch Long. Close to the side of the Loch there is a shed used for building small pleasure-boats. The word Ard signifying a promontory, the name, Ardmay, applies to the projection into the Loch at this place as well as to the hamlet. The projection is a piece of flat arable land, but the wood on the east rises to a considerable height and has a very dark appearance.
OS1/9/3/1 HIGH MORLAGGAN High Morlaggan High Morlaggan High Morlaggan High Morlaggan Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan William Paterson, Morlaggan Donald McLellan Tullich Mr. Martin, Factor 007 Formerly a farmhouse, but now included in the farm of "Tullich" and occupied by a shepherd. It stands on a rising ground beneath a range of overhanging craigs, and is surrounded by large loose rocks.
OS1/9/3/1 [Page] 1 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Ardmay:] "Ard, A height, an eminence (G.) [Gaelic] Madh, or Magh, * A surface, A field (G.) [Gaelic] * Dh and Gh in Gaelic, have the sound of G. [Below entry for High Morlaggan:] "Mor, Great; Lagan, A hollow, A cavity, (G)
OS1/9/3/2 MORLAGGAN Morlaggan Morlaggan Morlaggan Morlagan Morlaggan Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan William Paterson Donald McLellan Johnston's Co. [County] Map Mr. Martin, Factor 007 A name given to two houses and a superior cottage on the side of Loch Long. The cottage is occupied by W. & H. Paterson, Proprietors, the other houses by fishermen.
OS1/9/3/2 [Page] 2 County Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/3 CREAGAN Creagan Craggan Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Robert McLean Donald McLellan Johnston's Co. [County] Map 071 An inferior dwelling house on the farm of that name, occupied by a shepherd. The name signifies Rocks.
OS1/9/3/3 CREAGAN-SITHE Creag-an-sithe Creag-an-sithe Creag-an-sithe Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Robert McLean Donald McLellan 007 Two inferior dwelling houses on the farm of "Tullich" occupied by Cottars. The name signifies the fairy's rock.
OS1/9/3/3 GORTEN Gorten Gorten Gorton Gortean Robert McLean, Farmer Donald McLellan, Tullich Johnson's Co. [County] Map Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan 007 This name is applied to a superior dwelling house and two houses occupied by Cottars. The dwelling house is occupied by Robert McLean, Farmer, of the farm of "Creagan", and all are the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart [Baronet]. The name "Gorten", as now used, is supposed to be derived from Gortean an unproductive field.
OS1/9/3/3 [Page] 3 Co. [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Gorten:] Gortan - Stingy, unproductive, A [ ] fellow (G.) [Gaelic] [Below entry for Creag-an-Sithe:] Creag G. [Gaelic] A rock, An, the' Sithe, Gen. Sing. [Genitive Singular] of Sith, A fairy. Creag an Sithe. The fairy's Rock Creag an t-Sithe or Creagan Sithe would be correct Gaelic. The name as wirtten on plan at Glasgow to be allowed see Col. [Colonel] Cameron's minute. [Below entry for Creagan:] Creagan, pl. [plural] of Creag, A rock, Crag.
OS1/9/3/4 CREAGAN HILL Creagan Hill Creagan Hill Creagan Hill Donald McLellan Robert McLean Dugald McFarlan, Creagan 007 A low ridge topped hill, running between "Loch Long" and "Glen Culanach". The side which slopes to "Loch Long" is the steepest and most rugged.
OS1/9/3/4 PREAS-SEILEICH (Ruin) Preas Seileich (Ruin) Preas Seileich (Ruin) Preas Seileich (Ruin) Presstellach Prestelloch Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald McLellan, Tullich Robert McLean, Gorten Johnston's Co. [County] Map New Statistical Account 007 The ruin of a farm house which has not been occupied for a long period. The name signifies a willow bush. It is on the estate of Sir James Colquhoun Bart [Baronet].
OS1/9/3/4 [Page] 4 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Preas-Seileich:] Preas. (G.) [Gaelic] A bush, or shrub t-Seileich, The willow, from Seileach "Preas-Seileich", "willow bush" Name as written on plan not changed see page 3
OS1/9/3/5 INTRENCHMENT [natural, nr Strone T.P.] Intrenchment Intrenchment Intrenchment Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan, Arroquhar Peter McGregor, Glenmallan Robert Campbell, Arroquhar 007 An artificial intrenchment on the side of a very steep hill on the side of "Loch Long", about ½ a mile from "Strone T.P." [Turn Pike]. The principal ditch is nearly 20 chains in length, of an average breadth of 10 feet and a depth of 4. The earth has been thrown up from the ditch so as to form a considerable embankment in front, which would completly screen from view any person behind it. At its Northern extremity, which seems to have been the entrance to it, it is close to the Loch and on comparatively flat ground. Proceeding Southwards, where its formation is more perfect, it ascends the hill till it terminates in two ditches coming to a point. At this part the hillside is very steep. It is evidently of very ancient construction, though nothing is known relating to it by the people in the neighbourhood, to whom it is well known as the French Rig, though for what reason they cannot explain. Neither is there any account of it in the extracts relating to the Parish. Upon referring it to the Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan of Arroquhar, he is of opinion that it may be in connection with the expedition of Haco, King of Norway who in the Winter of 1262-3, and previous to the Battle of Contd. [Continued on page 6]
OS1/9/3/5 [Page] 5 Co. [County] Dumbarton [In left hand margin:] It is my opinion after a minute examination of this object on the ground that it has been formed by the natural action of water down the Hill side. There are several places in the Hill face higher up where the same hollowing out by water may be seen, although the object in question is the more continuous and most artificial looking J. Bayly Major RE [Royal Engineers]
OS1/9/3/6 INTRENCHMENT Contd [Continued from page 5] Largs, sailed with a fleet up Loch Long, and, after ravaging the country between that and Loch Lomond, landed near Finnart, about 1½ miles from this Intrenchment & lay there during the Winter.
OS1/9/3/6 [Page] 6 Co. [County] Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/7 CHURCH [nr Kirkfield Cottage] Church (Parish) Church (Parish) Church (Parish) Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar, Ph. [Parish] Schoolmaster Rev [Reverend] Colin McKenzie, Free Ch. [Church] Min. [Minister] 008 A neat building, on the side of Loch Long, erected about 20 years ago, and capable of containing a congregation of 250. There is a small Burial ground attached, but the proper burying ground of the Parish is at "Ballyhennan." The ruins of the old Church stand close to the new building and bear the date 1733, the period of its erection. Underneath the ruin is the Vault of the family of MacFarlan, which family at one time held considerable property in the Parish.
OS1/9/3/7 KIRKFIELD COTTAGE Kirkfield Cottage Kirkfield Cottage Kirkfield Cottage Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar Robert Campbell, Proprietor 008 A small cottage near the Church, the property of Robert Campbell, occupier.
OS1/9/3/7 [Page] 7 County Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/8 INVEREOCH COTTAGE Invereoch Cottage Invereoch Cottage Invereoch Cottage Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar Robert Campbell 008 A good cottage the property of Mr. Young, Glasgow. This name is compounded from Inver, (the proper spelling of which is Inbhir) which here signifies the mouth of the stream, and reoch, brindled or spotted, having reference to the mountain at the foot of which it is situated.
OS1/9/3/8 MANSFIELD Mansfield Mansfield Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar Robert Campbell and Malcolm McMerrich 008 A superior dwelling house the property of Malcolm McMerrich Occupier.
OS1/9/3/8 TAYNESS COTTAGE Tayness Cottage Tayness Cottage Tayness Cottage Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar Pharlane McFarlan, Proprietor 008 A superior Cottage the property of Pharlane McFarlan, Tarbet. This name is a corruption of Tigh-an-[Eas] which signifies the house at the Cascade. The house bearing that name formerly stood at the waterfall, near "Benreoch House" but has long since been removed.
OS1/9/3/8 [Page] 8 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Invereoch Cottage:] Inbhir. (G.) [Gaelic] A confluence of Waters, &c.
OS1/9/3/9 BENREOCH HOUSE Benreoch House Benreoch House Benreoch House John Ferguson, Proprietor Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster 008 A superior cottage near the Manse, occupied by the proprietor John Ferguson. It is named from the mountain at the foot of which it is situated.
OS1/9/3/9 MANSE [nr Benreoch House] Manse John Ferguson Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster 008 A superior dwelling house, with offices adjacent, the property of the Heritors of the Parish, and occupied by Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Parish Minister.
OS1/9/3/9 RUDHA GLAS Rudhaglas Rudhaglas John Ferguson Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster & Mr. Martin, Factor 007 This name signifies the Grey Point and applies to a projection, which rises to a considerable height in the wood above, into Loch Long. The name also applies to the house situated on the point.
OS1/9/3/9 [Page] 9 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Benreoch House:] "Beinn, Top of a mountain. (Beann pl: [plural] of Beinn. G: [Gaelic]) Readhe. Frozen, G. [Gaelic] Breac Speckled (G.) [Gaelic] [Below entry for Rudha Glas:] Rudha (G) [Gaelic] A point of land jutting into the sea; A promontory Glas. Grey "Rudha Glas" Adopted. See "Rudha Mòr" on Sheet 41 Lewis Island. N. H.
OS1/9/3/10 STUCKIVOULICH Stuckivoulich Stuckivoulich Stuchd-a-Bhuilg James McMerrich Proprietor Alexander Dewar Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan 008 A good dwelling house with offices attached the property of James McMerrich of Stuckgown, by whom it is also occupied. The name as given by the proprietor and others is a corruption of Stuchd-a-Bhuilg, Stuchd signifies a cliff &c, and bhuilg, a bag or bellows.
OS1/9/3/10 TIGH NA LARAICH Tigh na laraich Tigh na laraich Tigh na laraich Tigh na laraich Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar Robert Campbell Mr. Martin, Factor 008 This name signifies the fallen house which, though singularly descriptive of the present state of the ruins was the name borne by the houses when they were occupied. There were at one time a number of houses at this place but the ruins of two houses are all that now remain.
OS1/9/3/10 [Page] 10 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Tigh na laraich:] Tigh (G). [Gaelic] A house; na, of the; làraich, (gen [genitive] of Làrach.) The site of a building; a ruin; a habitation; a farm. "Tigh na Làraich", Adopted; See Arrangement of names on 6 inch sheets 41 and 44 Lewis Island, N.H. This name being descriptive of the object to which it applies it is correct to write it as separate words. [Further wording obscured be being overwritten] [Below entry for Stuckivoulich:] Stùchd, (G.) [Gaelic] A cliff or pinnacle of a roof A little hill jutting out from a greater Bhuilg. (gen. sing: def: [genitive singular definite] of Balg or Bolg.) A wallet; a quiver; a budget, scrip, satchel, &c. A', the.
OS1/9/3/11 STUCKGOWN HOUSE Stuckgown House Stuckgown House Stuckgown House Stuckgoun House James McMerrich, Proprietor Valuation Roll Johnston's County Map Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlane Tombstone in Churchyd [Churchyard] (date 1802) 008 A good mansion house situated in a beautiful and romantic position at the side of Loch Lomond. There are good offices and a small portion of ornamental ground attached. The method of spelling the name now chiefly used, is Stuckgown. Both names are corrupted from the true Gaelic. It is the property of James McMerrich.
OS1/9/3/11 STUCKGOWN BURN Stuckgown Burn Stuckgown Burn Stuckgown Burn Stuckgoun Burn James McMerrich Alexander Dewar, Ph. [Parish] Schoolmaster Donald McGibbon, Stuckivoulich Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlane 008 A good stream rising on the side of "Ben Reach" and pursuing a direct though rugged course, passes through the beautiful and romantic glen south of "Stuckgown House". In its passage through the glen it falls over a number of waterfalls and finally empties itself into "Loch Lomond" at the Lodge to "Stuckgown House".
OS1/9/3/11 [Page] 11 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Stuckgown House:] Stùc, or Stuchd, - A little hill jutting out from a greater. &c.
OS1/9/3/12 COIRE BHUILG Coire-bhuilg Coire-bhuilg Coire-bhuilg Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar James McMerrich 008 A natural depression in the side of "Ben Reach", extending more than five chains on each side of "Stuckgown Burn", at the point where an extensive range of rocks crosses that stream. Coire signifies a hollow in a hillside, and Bhuilg a bag or bellows &c.
OS1/9/3/12 CROIT A' CHLADAICH Croit-a-chladaich Croit-a-chladaich Croit-a-chladaich Croit-a-chladaich Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Rev [Reverend] Colin McKenzie Alexander Dewar, Ph. [Parish] Schoolm. [Schoolmaster] Mr. Martin, Factor 008 A poor dwelling house on the farm of "Firkin" occupied by Cottars. The name signifies the Croft or field on the shore.
OS1/9/3/12 [Page] 12 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Coire Bhuilg:] Coire, A mountain dell; A circular hollow between two hills, - Gael. [Gaelic] Bhuilg, See "Stuchd a' bhuilg" in [ ] Name Book "Coire Bhuilg" Adopted. See arrangement on sheet 41, 6 inch scale, Lewis island. RH [Below entry for Croit-a-chladaich:] Name as written on plan not to be changed for reason see page 3 Croit, (G). [Gaelic] A Croft; a small piece of arable ground. Chladaich, (G. [Gaelic] gen. sing. [genitive singular] of Cladach) A shore Croit a' Chladaich. The Croft by the shore. 'Croit a Chladaich' - Adopted. See similar arrangement on sheets of Lewis Island. RH
OS1/9/3/13 AN T-SREANG An Tsreang Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald McLellan, Tullich Alexander McDougal, Roadman Mr. Martin, Factor 008 A narrow glen between two ranges of hills extending from the Parish Church to "Glen Douglas", a distance of 3 miles. It is entered from "Arroquhar" by a moderately steep ascent which continues for a short distance. It then gradually [continued on page 14]
OS1/9/3/13 MONADH TIGHE NA LARAICH Monadh Tighe-na-Laraich Monadh Tighe-na-Laraich Monadh Tighe-na-Laraich Monadh Tighe-na-Laraich Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald McLellan, Tullich Alexander McDougal, Roadman Mr. Martin, Factor 008 This name signifies the moor of the fallen house and is applied to the hill south of Arroquar. This hill, though of considerable height is the lowest in the district. It falls on the West to Loch Long, on the East to the glen called "An Tsreang" and is connected on the south by a narrow ridge which rises gradually to the top of "Tullich Hill". Its sides are steep, but not generally rocky. Its top is round and the most prominent feature of the hill runs parallel with "Loch Long".
OS1/9/3/13 [Page] 13 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Monadh Tighe-na-laraich:] Monadh. (G) [Gaelic], A mountain Tighe (G) [Gaelic], (Gen: [Genitive] of Thigh) A house Laraich (G) [Gaelic], A ruin "Monadh Tighe na Laraich", Adopted, &c. [Below entry for An t-Sreang:] "An t-Sreang", (G) [Gaelic] The Cord or string, An t-Sreang Adopted in accordance with the correct orthography of the Gaelic Language. - See "Srath Mhic an t-Saoir" on Sheet 41. Lewis Island.
OS1/9/3/14 AN T-SREANG Continued An Tsreang Contd. [Continued] [Continued from page 13] rises for about a mile till the summit is attained where the water pursues opposite directions. It then gradually falls for the remainder of its length till it joins "Glen Douglas" at Invergroin. The hills on each side are very steep and high and occasionally rocky. Two considerable streams pursue opposite directions through it but neither of them bears a name. The name, An Tsreang, signifies line or cord.
OS1/9/3/14 [Page] 14 Co [County] Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/15 ALLT CHROIT-A-CHLAIDAICH Allt Chroit -a-chladaich Allt Chroit -a-chladaich Allt Chroit -a-chladaich Allt Chroit -a-chladaich Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald Sinclair, Firkin T.P. [Turn Pike] John McFarlan, Firkin Mr. Martin, Factor 008 A good stream rising between "Ben Reoch" and "Ben Bhreachd" which descends through a rugged channel down the side of the mountain and falls into Loch Lomond a little above "Croit-a-chlaidaich," from which it takes its name. Allt signifies a mountain stream. Croit is here put in the genitive case, (chroit). See Croit-a-chladaich
OS1/9/3/15 TULLICH HILL Tullich Hill Tullich Hill Tullich Hill Tullich Hill Tullich Hill Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster Donald Maclellan, Tullich Donald Macvein, Tullich Mr. Martin, Factor 008 A large oval shaped hill of great height, on the farm of that name. It falls on the south to "Glen Douglas" on the east to "An Tsreang" and on the west to Loch Long. Its south and east sides are the most rugged and difficult of ascent. It is connected with "Monadh Thighe-na-Laraich" by a long narrow topped ridge on which is a small feature but bearing no name.
OS1/9/3/15 Page] 15 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Tullich Hill:] Tuille, Tuilleadh, More, farther, distant. "Tula, Tulach, (G) [Gaelic], A hillock [Below entry for Allt Croit-a-chladaich:] Name to be engraved as written on plan at Glasgow - see reason why - page 3 "Allt Chroit a'Chladaich" Adopted, see arrangement of names on Sheets on Sheets 41 & 44 Lewis Island. Allt. (Gael) [Gaelic] - A mountain stream Croit * A little eminence, A Croft, A piece of arable ground &c Chladaich (Gen Sing: [Genitive Singular] of Cladach G. [Gaelic]) A shore, beach, a [stony beach?] * Chroit is the gen: sing: [genitive singular] of Croit
OS1/9/3/16 ALLT STUC AN TIOBAIRT Allt Stuchd-an-tiobairt Allt Stuchd-an-tiobairt Allt Stuchd-an-tiobairt Allt Stuchd-an-tiobairt Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald Sinclair John McFarlan Mr. Martin, Factor 004 A stream rising from the rocks on the side of "Ben Bhreachd" and, shortly receiving a number of smaller tributaries, pursues a course down the mountain through an entangled maze of copsewood interspersed with rocks, and empties itself into "Loch Lomond" near "Stuchd-an-tiobart," from which it takes its name.
OS1/9/3/16 [Page] 16 Co. [County] Dumbarton "Allt Stùchd an t-Iobairt", Adopted. See "Amhuinn an t-Strath Bhàin", on Sheet 41. Lewis Islands. NH Allt, (G) [Gaelic], A mountain stream. Stùchd, (G) [Gaelic], A little hill jutting out from a great one. An, the; t-Iobart. The Offering Note - Stùc-an-t-ìobairt in this name to be written as recommended page 20 See also answer to a remark on the same [Asterisked note regarding varieties of spelling, subsequently scored through:] t-Iobairt - Rule -" Masculine definites beginning with a vowel take t- before their nominative singular." (Munro P. [Page] 52)
OS1/9/3/17 BEN REOCH Ben Reoch Ben Reoch Ben Reoch Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan, Parish Minister and Gaelic Scholar John Ferguson, Benreoch House Mr. Martin, Factor 008 The mountain on the north end of the high range which runs between "Loch Lomond" and "An Tsreang". It rises to a great height and is the highest hill in the southern part of the parish. Its side next Loch Lomond is very rugged and steep, and is covered with innumerable knolls presenting a rocky appearance, and occasionally interspersed with small trees. The side which slopes to "An Tsreang" is of a much more regular appearance with very few rocks. On its summit are two large knolls one of which, "Cruach-a-bhuilg", is the highest point of the mountain. The other bears no name. The name "Ben Reoch", which signifies the streaked or spotted mountain, is now almost unknown, and except by the elder inhabitants of the district is generally styled "Arroquhar or "Stuckgown Hill", but the top, "Cruach a- bhuilg", is known to all.
OS1/9/3/17 [Page] 17 County Dumbarton "Beann, Beinn, Top of a mountain, (G) [Gaelic] Reodh, - (G) [Gaelic] Act of freezing, frozen It will be pedantic to restore the probable Gaelic derivation in opposition to these resident authorities. JB Major [Further pencil notes too faint to read]
OS1/9/3/18 CRUACH A' BHUILG Cruach-a'-bhuilg Cruach-a'-bhuilg Cruach-a'-bhuilg Cruach-a'-bhuilg Cruach-a'-bhuilg Cruach-a'-bhuilg Cruach-a'-bhuilg Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster John Ferguson, Benreoch Ho. [House] Alexander McDougal James McMerrich of Stuckgowan Rev [Reverend] Colin McKenzie Mr. Martin, Factor 008 A well known name applied to the highest point of "Ben Reoch." It forms an oval shaped knoll and on it are a few scattered rocks and a natural, shallow pool. The word Cruach signifies a stack or heap, and bhuilg a bag or bellows, and sometimes, as in this case, the top. (see Ben Reoch).
OS1/9/3/18 [Page] 18 County Dumbarton Cruach, (G) [Gaelic], A pile; a heap; a high hill Bhuilg, A wallet Cruach a' Bhuilg. Adopted, See sheets of Lewis Island
OS1/9/3/19 FIRKIN T.P. Firkin T.P. [Turn Pike] Firkin T.P. [Turn Pike] Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald Sinclair John McFarlan Mr. Martin, Factor Table of Rates 008 A tollbar on the road from Dumbarton to Inverary.
OS1/9/3/19 RUDHA BAN Rudha-ban Rudha-ban Rudha-ban Rudha-ban Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald Sinclair John McFarlan Mr. Martin, Factor 008 Rudha ban, pronounced Ru-ban, signifies The white or fair point. It is applied to a small, pointed, projection into Loch Lomond.
OS1/9/3/19 RUDHA DUBH Rudha Dubh Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald Sinclair John McFarlan Mr. Martin, Factor 008 A point like the above projecting into Loch Lomond. It is of considerable size and semi circular shape. The turnpike road passes along its margin which is bordered with flat and sloping rocks. This name like the above is descriptive of the object and is formed from the words Rudha a point and du black.
OS1/9/3/19 [Page] 19 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Rudha Ban:] Rudha. (G) [Gaelic]. A point of land. Bàn, fair [Below entry for Rudha Dubh:] Dubh (G) [Gaelic], Black
OS1/9/3/20 STUC AN T-IOBAIRT Stuchd-an-tiobairt Stuchd-an-tiobairt Stuchd-an-tiobairt Stuchd-an-tiobairt Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald Sinclair, Tollkeeper John McFarlan, Firkin Mr. Martin, Factor 008 An inferior dwelling house on the farm of Firkin, occupied by Cottars. The name signifies The hill of sacrifice and a place of worship is supposed to have stood here.
OS1/9/3/20 FIRKIN Firkin Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald Sinclair, Tollkeeper John McFarlan, Firkin Mr. Martin, Factor 008 An inferior farm house, with a large sheep farm attached, the property of Sir James Colquhoun of Luss, Bart [Baronet]. This name is supposed to be a corruption of the word Fairchean, a mallet, which is descriptive of the shape of the piece of land on which the house stands.
OS1/9/3/20 FIRKIN POINT Firkin Point Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Donald Sinclair, Tollkeeper John McFarlan, Firkin Mr. Martin, Factor 008 An irregular shaped point, covered with good pasture, projecting into Loch Lomond. Its edge is flat and gravelly and sprinkled with forest trees.
OS1/9/3/20 [Page] 20 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Stuc-an-t-iobairt:] Name not be changed See reason page 3 "Stuchd an t-Iobairt. The offering hill". See page 16.
OS1/9/3/21 ROBERT THE BRUCE'S TREE Robert Bruce's Tree Robert Bruce's Tree Robert Bruce's Tree Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster Donald Sinclair 008 A small scotch yew near "Stuckd-an-tiobairt" traditionally reported to have been the resting place of King Robert 1st, while on one of his expeditions. It is of very remarkable appearance and seems to be very ancient. The root has so interwoven itself with a small rock as to give it the appearance of being composed of stone. The trunk is about 4 feet in diameter and the branches cover a space of 90 feet in circumference. The tree is about 15 feet in height, but, as the branches are regularly pruned with a view to its spreading, its growth is stunted.
OS1/9/3/21 [Page] 21 County Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/22 [Page] 22 [Blank page]
OS1/9/3/23 DOUGLAS WATER Douglas Water Douglas Water Douglas Water Douglass Water Dubhghlas Water Johnston's Co. [County] Map Montague Martin Esqr. Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster Fullarton's Gazetteer Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan 008 A considerable stream bearing its name from where it enters "Glen Douglas", at the junction of two streams, ¼ of a mile West of Tullich, and flowing in an easterly direction falls into Loch Lomond at Inveruglas. It forms the boundary between Arroquhar & Luss for the whole of its Course. It derives its name from the glen through which it passes., the Gaelic of which (Gleann Dubhghlas), signifies the dark grey glen. The true gaelic is now seldom, or never, used.
OS1/9/3/23 [Page] 23 Co. [County] Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/24 COILLE-CHORAIN Coille-a'-chorain Coille-a'-chorain Coille-a'-chorain Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Montague Martin Esqr. John Douglas, Invergroin 008 An inferior dwelling house on the farm of "Tullich", occupied by Cottars. Coille signifies a wood. Chorain a reaping hook.
OS1/9/3/24 INVERGROIN Invergroin Invergroin Invergroin Invergroin Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Montague Martin Esq Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster Johnston's Co. [County] Map 008 A good farm steading with a large sheep farm attached. The property of Sir James Colquhoun of Luss, Bart [Baronet].
OS1/9/3/24 TULLICH Tullich Tullich Tullich Tullich Tullich Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster Donald McLellan, Farmer Valuation Roll Montague Martin Esqr. Factor 008 A good farm steading with a large sheep farm attached,the property of Sir James Colquhoun of Luss, Bart [Baronet].
OS1/9/3/24 [Page] 24 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Tullich:] Tula, Tulach, Gen: [Genitive] Tulaich, A hillock, (G) [Gaelic] [Below entry for Coille-Chorain:] Name not to be changed as written on plan see reason on page 3 Coille, A wood or grove, (G) [Gaelic]. Chorrain, (gen: [genitive] of Corran) A reaping hook, (G) [Gaelic]. [Below entry for Invergroin:] "Inbhir, (G.) [Gaelic], A confluence of waters. Gruinn, (G) [Gaelic], A crowd, A group, A cluster.
OS1/9/3/25 BEINN BHREAC Ben Bhreachd Ben Bhreachd Ben Bhreachd Ben Bhreachd Ben Bhreachd Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Alexander Dewar Schoolmaster Montague Martin Esqr. Donald Sinclair, Firkin T.P. [Turn Pike] 008 A high sharp peaked mountain on the South end of the high range which runs between "Loch Lomond" and "An Tsreang". Its east side, or that sloping to Loch Lomond, is a mass of irregular rocks sloping in every direction & having a very rugged appearance. Its west side, or that which falls to "An Tsreang", is very regular and presents very few rocks. The hill on all sides is very steep and difficult of ascent. The name signifies the mottled or spotted mountain. On it there are no seperate features bearing names.
OS1/9/3/25 [Page] 25 Co [County] Dumbarton Beinn Bhreac - Written correctly on Plan at Glasgow. "Beinn, (G) [Gaelic]. A mountain, a hill. Bhreachd (from Breac) spotted, speckled, etc (G.) [Gaelic]
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OS1/9/3/27 DOUNE Doune Doune Doune Doun Montague Martin Esqr. Factor Valuation Roll Alexander Dewar, Schoolmaster Johnston's Co. [County] Map 008 A good farm steading the property of Sir James Colquhoun of Luss, Bart. [Baronet]. Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan supposes this name to have been derived from Dun, a hill or fortification.
OS1/9/3/27 INBHIR AN TEACHAIN Inbhir-an-teachan Inbhir-an-teachan Inbhir-an-teachan Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Montague Martin Esqr. John Douglas, Invergroin 008 An inferior dwelling house, occupied by a Shepherd, the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet]
OS1/9/3/27 [Page] 27 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Inbhir-an-teachain:] Name not to be changed see reason on page 3 Inbhir, A confluence of waters; a', from, out of; teachan, from teach, A house Gael. [Gaelic] Teachan dim. [diminutive] of teach, gen. sing. [genitive singular] teachain
OS1/9/3/28 CONA GHLEANN Cona Ghleann Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Montague Martin Esqr. Factor John Douglas, Invergroin 008 A narrow glen of about a mile and a half in length, having steep hills rising on each side of it. It joins "Glen Douglas" about a mile west from "Invergroin" and sweeps in a southwesterly direction and terminates on 010 a' Trace 1. A large stream rises at its head and follows a course through the glen till it falls into "Douglas Water".
OS1/9/3/28 CONAGHLEANN (Ruins) Conaghleann (Ruins) Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Montague Martin Esqr. Factor John Douglas, Invergroin 008 The ruins of a small hamlet, on the farm of "Doune", which has not been occupied for upwards of 20 years. It derives its name from the glen at the mouth of which it is situated. The name applies to the ruins on both sides of the stream.
OS1/9/3/28 [Page] 28 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Cona Ghleann:] "Cona, (G) [Gaelic] Cat's tail or [moss crops] Ghleann, from gleann, a valley or glen
OS1/9/3/29 GLEN DOUGLAS Glen Douglas Glen Douglas Glen Douglas Glen Douglass Gleann Dubhghlas Montague Martin Esqr. Factor Johnston's Co. [County] Map Donald McLellan, Tullich Fullarton's Gazetteer Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan 008 An extensive valley running through nearly the whole breadth of the County, which is here nearly 5 miles broad. It is entered from Loch Long side by a steep acclivity which continues for ½ a mile and up which a parish road runs in a zigzag direction. It then becomes nearly level the ground being flat and generally cultivated for a breadth of a quarter of a mile, though from long neglect a great portion of the land is regaining its original heathy appearance. Nearly midway through the glen it is joined by "Cona Ghleann" running Southwards and a little further on "An Tsreang" running Northwards after which it proceeds in nearly the same state as already described till approaching its eastern termination it becomes narrower and the ground more rugged. It terminates on the east at "Inveruglas" on the side of "Loch Lomond". The hills on each side rise to a great height and [continued on page 30]
OS1/9/3/29 [Page] 29 County Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/30 GLEN DOUGLAS Contd. [Continued] Glen Douglas Contd. [Continued from page 29] are generally rocky. Through this valley "Douglas Water pursues the whole of its course, and a parish road runs along the North side of that stream which connects the Turnpike Road on "Loch Long" side with that on the side of "Loch Lomond". The name, "Glen Douglas", by which it is now known is a corruption of "Gleann Dubhghlas", or the dark grey glen.
OS1/9/3/30 [Page] 30 County Dumbarton [Below Description remarks:] or rather I think from Rudha Glas pronounced Ruaglas See Inveruglas (the Grey point) at the mouth of this water where it falls into Loch Lomond.
OS1/9/3/31 STOB GOBHLACH Stob gobhlach Stob gobhlach Stob gobhlach Stob gobhlach Peter Turner Donald Sinclair John Macfarlan Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan 008 This name is applied to a flat topped hill of considerable height in the South East of the Parish of Arrochar The South side falls to "Glen Douglas". and the East on which is "Lochan Uaine" falls to "Loch Lomond". The name is derived from the slightly forked appearance of the top.
OS1/9/3/31 CAMUS-NAN-CLAIS Camus-nan-clais Camus-nan-clais Camus-nan-clais Camus-nan-clais Camsnaglash Peter Turner Adam Walker Coll Lindsay Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Robertson's Tourists' Guide 008 A good house occupied by Cottars, and the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet]. This name is very descriptive and is taken from the bay on the side of which the house stands and the number of natural furrows in the field adjoining.
OS1/9/3/31 [Page] 31 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Stob Gobhlach:] "Stob", (G.) [Gaelic]. A stake; any pointed iron or stick. "Gobhlach", (G.) [Gaelic] Forked; pronged. [Below entry for Camus-nan-clais:] Name to be changed - see reason why page 3 Camus,(G.) [Gaelic]. A bay; a creek; a harbour. Clais, (G.) [Gaelic]. A furrow; a hollow; "nan", of the, - "Clais", owing to the preceding article "nan" becomes pluralized, and may signify furrows, hollows, &c., the orthography being the same. NH [or possibly RH]] Camus nan Clais, - the bay of the hollows.
OS1/9/3/32 FIRKIN BURN Firkin Burn Firkin Burn Firkin Burn Adam Walker, Glenmallochan Donald Sinclair, Firkin T.P. [Turn Pike] John McFarlan, Firkin 008 A good stream rising on the north west slope of "Stob-gobhlach", pursuing a north easterly direction and falls into "Loch Lomond", near "Firkin" from which it takes its name
OS1/9/3/32 LOCHAN UAINE Lochan Uaine or Fairy Loch Lochan Uaine or Fairy Loch Lochan Uaine or Fairy Loch Lochan Uaine or Fairy Loch Lochan Uaine or Fairy Loch Peter Turner Adam Walker Coll Lindsay Donald Sinclair Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Robertson's Tourists' Guide 008 A small loch, known by these names on the east slope of "Stob-gobhlach". about 20 chains north of "Camus nan clais" the name Lochan Uaine signifies the small Green loch. (See Continuation [on page 33]).
OS1/9/3/32 RUDHA MOR Rudha Mor Rudha Mor Rudha Mor Rudha Mor Rudha Mor Adam Walker Peter Turner. Auchengavin John McFarlan Coll Lindsay, Culag Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan 008 This name is applied to a sloping, large point of land, partly wooded, Steep on the south side, Projecting into "Loch Lomond", about a mile north of Inverbeg Inn. (See Continuation [on page 33]).
OS1/9/3/32 [Page] 32 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Rudha Mòr:] "Rudha" (G. [Gaelic]). A point of land; a promontory, "Mor", (G. [Gaelic]) Great. "Rudha Mòr", Great point. [Below entry for Lochan Uaine:] "Lochan, (G: [Gaelic] The diminutive of Loch.) A little lake. Uaine, (G. [Gaelic]) Green, pale &c.
OS1/9/3/33 LOCHAN UAINE Continued Contd. [Continued] Lochan Uaine or Fairy Loch 008 Continued [from page 32] The following extract from "Robertson's Tourists' Guide" will explain the names of this small lake. "On the top of the hill is the enchanting "Lochan Uaine" which empties itself into the bay of Camsnaglash. It was said in ancient times to have been employed by a tribe of fairies as a bowl or tub in which they mingled dyestuffs. Any person desirous of having his wool dyed proceeded about dusk to the banks of the enchanted lake, laid down the bundle to be operated upon, together with a thread of the particular colour wanted, and retired. Returning in the morning he was sure to find his goods nicely finished and dyed to the very shade". At the present time when the rays of the sun play on this lake it seems to partake of all the colours in the rainbow.
OS1/9/3/33 RUDHA MOR Continued Contd. [Continued] Rudha Mor 008 [Continued from page 32] This projection in shape has much the appearance of a boot and stands nearly isolated, being seperated from the hill behind it by a precipitous ravine [sketch drawn on page]. It is generally known to people at a distance southwards as the point or promontory of "Firkin" from being on that farm, but is well known to those in the immediate locality and Northwards as "Rudha Mor" or the great point. "Firkin Point" is in reality a small projection at the farmhouse of that name.
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OS1/9/3/35 INVERBEG INN Inverbeg Inn Inverbeg Inn Inverbeg Inn Inverbeg Inn Inverbeg Inn Inverbeg Inn John Macfarlane, Occupier Adam Walker Peter Turner Montague Martin Esqr., Factor Johnston's Co. [County] Map Robertson's Tourists' Guide 008 A small inn on the turnpike road from "Dumbarton" to "Inverary. And at which there is a permanent ferry across "Loch Lomond" to Rowardennan". Occupied by John Macfarlan it is the property of Sir James Colquhoun, Bart [Baronet]. Near to this is a small natural mound only remarkable for its regular shape. The name "Inverbeg" is a corruption of Inbhir-beag or the small confluence.
OS1/9/3/35 INVERUGLAS (Ruins) Inveruglas (in ruins) Inveruglas (in ruins) Inveruglas (in ruins) Nether Inveruglas Peter Turner Adam Walker Coll Lindsay Johnston's Co. [County] Map 008 This name is applied to a ruin formerly an Inn, on the side of the old post road from "Dumbarton to Inverary". It is the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart [Baronet]. The name is a contraction of "Inbhir an rudha ghlas", or the confluence of the grey point.
OS1/9/3/35 [Page] 35 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Inveruglas:] "Inbhir", (G) [Gaelic]. A confluence of waters "Rudha", (G) [Gaelic]. A point of land "Ghlas", (G) [Gaelic]. Grey [Below entry for Inverbeg Inn:] "Inbhir" As above "Beg" - Little, small adj. [adjective]
OS1/9/3/36 FERRY [Inverbeg - Rowardennan] King's Ferry King's Ferry King's Ferry Ferry Ferry Ferry Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan John MacFarlane, Inverbeg Inn Robert Campbell, Arroquhar Adopted, See Name Book of Stirlingshire Sheet 006 Mr. Martin, Factor for Sir James Colquhoun. Mr. Jolly, Factor for the Duke of Montrose. 008 A ferry which has existed from time immemorial for the conveyance of passangers from "Inverbeg" to "Rowardennan". Cattle, Carriages, &c are also conveyed across the Loch in boats constructed for that purpose. The proprietors are the Duke of Montrose and Sir James Colquhoun of Luss, Bart [Baronet]. It is rented jointly by Mr. Blair, of the Hotel at Rowardennan, and John MacFarlane of the Inn at Inverbeg.
OS1/9/3/36 [Page] 36 Co [County] Dumbarton The two latter authorities recommend "Ferry" only to be adopted.
OS1/9/3/37 GLEN MALLAN Glen Mallan Glen Mallan Glen Mallan Glen Mallan Peter MacGregor, Glenmallan Colin MacKay, Gleann na Caorruinn Duncan Campbell, Gorten Finlay Sinclair, Gortean na Leirg 009 A well known name applied to a narrow and rugged glen extending from the side of "Loch Long" till it joins "Gleann na Caorruinn" and "Gleann Culannach", which latter is a continuation of it. The derivation of this name is not known.
OS1/9/3/37 STRONE T.P. Strone T.P. [Turn Pike] Peter MacGregor, Glenmallan Colin MacKay, Gleann na Caorruinn Duncan Campbell, Gorten Finlay Sinclair, Gortean na Leirg 009 A tollbar on the turnpike road from Dumbarton to Arrochar. The houses near this bear no name.
OS1/9/3/37 STRONMALLANACH Stronmallanach Stronmalachan Peter MacGregor, Glenmallan Colin MacKay, Gleann na Caorruinn Duncan Campbell, Gorten Finlay Sinclair, Gortean na Leirg Johnston's Co. [County] Map 009 A poor dwelling house on the side of the hill of that name. It is the property of Sir James Colquhoun, Bart. [Baronet] and was formerly a farm house.
OS1/9/3/37 [Page] 37 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Glen Mallan:] Gleann Mallan Màla A bag &c. Gleann Màlan See Gleann Cùlanach p. [page] 41a for Gleann
OS1/9/3/38 CULANACH (Ruins) Culanach (In Ruins) Peter MacGregor Duncan Campbell Colin MacKay Finlay Sinclair 009 The ruins of a farm house, unoccupied for 40 years, standing in the glen of that name.
OS1/9/3/38 GLENMALLAN Glenmallan Glenmallan Glenmallan Miss Drummond, Proprietress Peter MacGregor Duncan Campbell 009 A superior dwelling situated at the mouth of the glen of that name. It is occupied by the proprietress Miss Drummond.
OS1/9/3/38 STRONE MALLANACH Strone Mallanach Strone Mallanach Strone Mallanach Peter MacGregor Duncan Campbell Colin MacKay Finlay Sinclair 009 A regular shaped steep hill of inconsiderable height, the West of which projects into "Loch Long" from which The word "Strone", which is the English form of the Gaelic "Sron", is derived. The word Mallanach is supposed to be much corrupted, therefor its derivation cannot be traced.
OS1/9/3/38 [Page] 38 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Strone Mallanach:] Strone. A hill that terminates a range Jamieson [Below entry for Culanach:] "Cùlanach," (G) [Gaelic] Background
OS1/9/3/39 CREAG ENNIC Creag Ennic Creag Ennic Creag Ennic Peter McGregor, Glenmallan Findlay Sinclair, Gortean na Leirg Colin McKay 009 A range of rocks situated near the top of "Ben Bhreachd", on its western side. The rocks are largest and steepest at the North end, and gradually become smaller as the approach the South termination of the range. This is a corrupted name whose derivation is not known.
OS1/9/3/39 CLACH SGOILTE Clach Sgoilte Clach Sgoilte Clach Sgoilte Duncan MacFarlane, Strone Donald Sinclair, Firken Colin McKay 009 A well known name, signifying Split Stone, applied to a huge mass of rock at the end of "Creag Tharsuinn." It appears at one time to have been one piece, but has been severed by natural causes so as to leave a passage of 3 feet in breadth between the one part and the other.
OS1/9/3/39 [Page] 39 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Creag Ennic:] Creag properly spelled altho [although] Ennic not known [Below entry for Clach Sgoilte:] "Clach". A stone Sgoilte, Cleft, splintered, &c.
OS1/9/3/40 BEINN A' MHANAICH Ben a' Mhanaich Ben a' Mhanaich Ben a' Mhanaich Ben a' Mhanaich Finnart Hill Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan, Arroquhar Donald Sinclair, Firken Colin McKay, Gleann na Caorruinn Peter Turner, Auchengavin New Statistical Account 009 A mountain, on the western boundary of the Parish of Luss, which rises 2300 feet above the level of the sea. Its top is formed of two distinct knolls with a considerable hollow between them. Its North end is composed of a broken precipice which, to look at from the bottom, seems to be almost perpendicular, and is quite inaccessible. It bears a minor feature, ("Ben Bhreachd"), on its western slope. The name signifies the Monk's Mountain.
OS1/9/3/40 BEINN BHREAC Ben Bhreachd Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan, Arroqquhar Donald Sinclair, Firken Colin McKay, Gleann na Caorruinn Peter Turner, Auchengavin New Statistical Account 009 A name signifying the Mottled Mountain applied to an irregular shaped hill on the Western slope of "Ben a' Mhanaich" and considerably lower than that mountain.
OS1/9/3/40 [Page] 40 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Beinn a' Mhanaich:] Corrected at O.S.O [Ordnance Survey Office] Glasgow "Ben" from "Beinn or Beann, A mountain, A hill "Mhanaich", from Manach. A Monk, A recluse. [Below entry for Beinn Bhreac:] Ben, as above "Bhreachd" from "Breac", Spotted, speckled &c. Beinn Bhreac written on plan at O.S.O. [Ordnance Survey Office] Glasgow
OS1/9/3/41 CREAG THARSUINN Creag Tharsuinn Creag Tharsuinn Creag Tharsuinn Colin MacKay Finlay Sinclair Duncan McFarlan, Strone 009 A long and nearly perpendicular precipice of 50 feet in height, situated between "Cruach an t-Sithein" and "Ben Eich". The rock is named from its peculiar position- tarsuinn literally signifying - going crossways.
OS1/9/3/41 CRUACH AN T-SITHEIN Cruach an t'Sithein Cruach an t'Sithein Cruach an t'Sithein Cruach an t'Sithein Cruach an t'Sithein Cruach an t'Sithein Cruachanstean Peter McGregor Colin MacKay Donald McLellan Finlay Sinclair Donald Sinclair, Firkin Dugald McFarlan, Creagan Johnston's Co. [County] Map 009 A well known name applied to one of the highest hills in the Parish of Luss. It rises steeply and regularly, on all sides, to a great height, and its top is crowned with a little round knoll of about 2 chains in diameter at the top, from which it takes its name. "Cruach an t'Sithein" signifies the hill of the little knoll, or, in this case, the fairy knoll, as at a remote period it was supposed to be the resort of a tribe of fairies.
OS1/9/3/41 [Page] 41 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Creag Tharsuinn:] Creag, (G.) [Gaelic] A rock Tharsuinn, (from Tarsuinn) Transverse, lateral [Below entry for Cruach an t-Sithein:] "Cruach, (G.) [Gaelic] A high hill Sithean, der: [derivative] of Sithein, a little hill, or knoll
OS1/9/3/41A GLEANN CULANACH ALLT DERIGAN Gleann Culanach Gleann Culanach Gleann Culanach Gleann Culanach Glen Gillanoch Glen Caldanach Allt Derigan Donald McLellan, Tullich Dugald McFarlan, Creagan Duncan McNie, Stronmallanach Colin MacKay, Gleann na Caorruinn Johnston's Co. [County] Map New Statistical Account
OS1/9/3/41A [Page] 41a Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Gleann Cùlanach:] "Gleann Cùlanach," Glen of the Background. [Below entry for Allt Derigan:] probably from "Deargan - Red stain" (Gaelic)
OS1/9/3/42 CARRAIG NAN RON Carraig nan Ron or Dog Rock Carraig nan Ron or Dog Rock Carraig nan Ron or Dog Rock Finlay Sinclair, Gortean na Leirg Duncan Campbell, Gorten Duncan McNab, Portincaple 009 A large flat rock, approaching an oval shape, situated at the point where the North side of "Loch Goyle" joins "Loch Long". At high water this rock is surrounded by the sea, and at low water forms a peninsula. About 30 years ago when fish were more plentiful in the Loch this rock was the frequent resort of seals which were in the habit of scrambling to the top of it and there basking in the rays of the sun, which accounts for the name . It is equally well known as "Carraig nan Ron" or as the "Dog Rock".
OS1/9/3/42 [Page] 42 Co [County] Dumbarton "Carraig. (G) [Gaelic] A rock Ròn, (G) [Gaelic] A seal, or sea calf Carraig nan Ròn. The Seals' Rock.
OS1/9/3/43 URACH Urach Urach Urach Colin McKay, Gleann na Caorruinn Finlay Sinclair Peter MacGregor, Glenmallan 009 A name, supposed to be a corruption of Diorbheachd, applied to about 2 miles of the very steep hillside which slopes to "Loch Long". A very small portion of the name belongs to "Row Parish", the principal part being in Roseneath. It extends in "Row Parish" from the Parish boundary to a stream a quarter of a mile to the North of it.
OS1/9/3/43 [Page] 43 Co [County] Dumbarton "Urach," (G.) [Gaelic] A bottle, pail, or small tub. Earthy, dusty.
OS1/9/3/44 GORTEAN NA LEIRG Gortean na Leirg Gortean na Leirg Gortean na Leirg Finlay Sinclair, Occupier Colin MacKay, Gleann na Caoruinn Duncan Campbell 009 A small cottage occupied by the Shepherd on the "Portincaple" part of the farm of "Faslane". The name signifies The little field on the eminence.
OS1/9/3/44 PORTINCAPLE FERRY Portincaple Ferry Portincaple Ferry Portincaple Ferry Portincaple Ferry Johnston's Co. [County] Map Duncan McNab, Ferryman Alexander McPhun, Postmaster Finlay Sinclair 009 A ferry from "Portincaple", Dumbartonshire, to "Mark", Argyleshire. It has been in existence for several centuries, and before the road alongside "Loch Long" was made, was the route chosen by the Dukes of Argyle on their way from Glasgow to Inverary. The land on the Dumbarton side belongs to Sir James Colquhoun, Bart [Baronet], and that on the Argyle side to the Duke of Argyle.
OS1/9/3/44 [Page] 44 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Goirtean-na-leirg:] Preserve the rule leathann [ ] leathainn &c. Goirtean Name not to be changed see reason why page 3 "Gortean, (G.) [Gaelic] A garden, a little field. Leirg, from Learg, G. [Gaelic] A little eminence.
OS1/9/3/45 FAOILEANN Faoileann Faoileann Faoileann Dugald Thomson, Faoileann Duncan McNab, Portincaple Finlay Sinclair, Gortean na Leirg 009 An inferior dwelling house on the farm of "Strone", occupied by Cottars. The name signifies A seagull.
OS1/9/3/45 PORTINCAPLE Portincaple Portincaple Portincaple Portincaple Portincaple Johnston's County Map Phillips' County Atlas Alexander McPhun, Postmaster Peter McGregor, Glenmallan Duncan McFarlan, Strone 009 A small hamlet, comprised of Cottars' houses, on the side of "Loch Long". It is the property of Sir James Colquhoun of Luss, Bart [Baronet], and has long been a ferrying station. (See Ferry of that name).
OS1/9/3/45 TIGH NA CRAIGE Tigh na Craige Tigh na Craige Tigh na Craige Dugald Thomson Finlay Sinclair Duncan Campbell, Whistlefield 009 A name signifying "Craighouse" applied to an inferior dwelling house and Cowshed, a little to the South of "Portincaple".
OS1/9/3/45 [Page] 45 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Faoileann:] "Faoìleann," (G) [Gaelic] The Sea gull [ ] signify an arable piece of land near the sea [Below entry for Tigh na Craige:] "Tigh na Craige", (G) The Craig house.
OS1/9/3/46 BEALACH AN T-SAIC Bealach an t-Saic Bealach an t-Saic Bealach an t-Saic Finlay Sinclair Colin MacKay Duncan McFarlan 009 A name signifying The pass of the burden, from the fact of ponies having been formerly driven through it laden with panniers. It is a slight and wide depression between "Ben Mheannach" and "Maol a' Fheidh".
OS1/9/3/46 THE STRONE The Strone Finlay Sinclair Colin MacKay Duncan McFarlan 009 The anglicised form of the word An t-Sron - a projection. It applies to a long, narrow topped, regular shaped, projection of considerable height, shooting out from the South side of "Maol a'Fheidh". The farm of Strone, which lies at the base of its South end, derives its name from this.
OS1/9/3/46 [Page] 46 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Bealach an t-Saic:] Bealach, - A pass. (G) [Gaelic] Saic, from Sac, A load, a burden.
OS1/9/3/47 FRUIN WATER Fruin Water Fruin Water Fruin Water Fruin Water Fruin Water Froon Water Phillips' County Atlas New Statistical Account Duncan McFarlan Colin MacKay Robertson's Tourists' Guide Johnston's Co. [County] Map 009 An important stream rising off the West side of "Maol a' Fheidh" and passing the farmhouse of "Strone" enters "Glen Fruin", and after a course of nearly ten miles falls into Loch Lomond near "Red House". The name "Glen Fruin" is supposed to be derived from "Gleann a' Bhroin" which signifies the "Glen of the Lamentation" having reference to the sanguinary conflict between the McGregors & Colquhouns which took place in the beginning of the 17th Century, which will be described hereafter.
OS1/9/3/47 [Page] 47 Co [County] Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/48 MAOL AN FHEIDH Maol a' Fheidh Finlay Sinclair Colin MacKay Peter McGregor Duncan McFarlan 009 A high and regular shaped promontory on the farm of "Strone". It is the principal feature of 4. On its West slope is situated "Maol Odhar", and "The Strone" projects a mile from its South end, and a pass runs between its North end and "Ben Mheannach". The name, "Maol a Fheidh", signifies The Deer's Promontory.
OS1/9/3/48 MAOL ODHAR Maol Odhar Maol Odhar Maol Odhar Maol Odhar Finlay Sinclair Colin MacKay Peter McGregor Duncan McFarlan 009 A dun coloured promontory, as its name implies, on the West side of "Maol a'Fheidh". Though of no great height it is a very prominent feature.
OS1/9/3/48 [Page] 48 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Maol Odhar:] "Maol", (G) [Gaelic] A promontory. "Odhar", (G) [Gaelic] Dun colored. [Below entry for Maol an Fheidh:] "Fhèidh, fr: [from] Fiadh. A deer.
OS1/9/3/49 ALLT DARACH Allt Darach Finlay Sinclair Colin MacKay 009 A good stream rising at the foot of "Creag a' Spardain". and, pursuing a circuitous course, falls into "Loch Long" near "Finnart". This name and the above are only known to the authorities quoted, who having been in the district respectively 40 and 20 years, are the best to be got.
OS1/9/3/49 BINNEAN NAM BOC Binnein nam Boc Binnein nam Boc Finlay Sinclair Colin MacKay 009 A slight eminence a little to the North of "Gortean na Leirg". On its South end is a small peak from which the word Binnein is derived. The name, altogether, signifies The peak of The Bucks.
OS1/9/3/49 [Page] 49 Co [County] Dumbarton Below entry for Binnean nam Boc:] Binnein (g.) [Gaelic] A pinnacle, a high conical hill, [ ] Boc (G.) [Gaelic] A [buck] [Below entry for Allt Darach:] Allt (G.) [Gaelic] A mountain stream Darach (G.) [Gaelic] An oak Darach nom. sing. [nominative singular] and gen. plur. [genitive plural]
OS1/9/3/50 ALLT INNSE Allt Innse Allt Innse Allt Innse Colin MacKay Duncan McFarlan Finlay Sinclair 010 A good stream, signifying the stream of shelter, rising on the side of "Ben Tharsuinn", and flowing down the side of that mountain falls into "Auchingaich Burn" a mile from its source.
OS1/9/3/50 [Page] 50 Co [County] Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/50 Although situation on the page is given as Sheet IX i.e. 009, this object is in fact on Sheet 010, as it has been entered in Situation transcription box, and in the index.
OS1/9/3/51 AUCHINGAICH BURN Auchingaich Burn Auchingaich Burn Auchingaich Burn Duncan McFarlan Colin McKay Finlay Sinclair 009 ; 012 A good stream rising in the Glen between "Ben Chaorich" and "Maol a' Fheidh", which flows in a Southerly direction and falls into"Fruin Water" near "Auchinguich" which name is supposed to be derived from Achadh an Chatha, which signifies The Battlefield, as is stands on the site of the Battle between the McGregors and Colquhouns, fought in 1622.
OS1/9/3/51 ALLT GARBH Allt Garbh Duncan McFarlan Colin MacKay Finlay Sinclair 009 A rugged stream, as its name implies, rising on the side of "Ben Chaorich" and flowing down the side of that mountain falls into "Auchinguich Burn" near its source.
OS1/9/3/51 [Page] 51 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Allt Garbh:] Allt, (G.[Gaelic]) A mountain stream. Garbh (G. [Gaelic]) of unequal surface
OS1/9/3/52 BEINN LOCHAIN Ben Lochain Ben Lochain Ben Lochain Peter Turner Archibald Cameron Colin MacKie 010 This name is applied to a ridge topped hill considerably lower than "Ben Eich," and "Doune Hill" betwixt which it is situated the name signifies the hill of the small loch from a small pool in its vicinity.
OS1/9/3/52 STUC BAN Stuchd a' Bhan Peter Turner 010 A rock on the southern slope of "Doune Hill." the name is only now known to the authority quoted
OS1/9/3/52 [Page] 52 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Beinn Lochain:] "Beinn, (G. [Gaelic]) A mountain; a hill, &c Lochain, or Lochan, (dim: [diminutive] of Loch.) A little loch. "Beinn Lochain", The hill of the little loch; - Gael. [Gaelic] [Below entry for Stuc Ban:] Stùchd, (G. [Gaelic]) A little hill jutting out from a or Stùc ........greater; a cliff or pinnacle, &c Bhàn, (G) [Gaelic]. Fair; white. otherwise Bàn - see "Rudha Bàn" &c "Stùchd Bhàn" - White pinnacle, or cliff
OS1/9/3/52 "Sithe Mor" scored out, to be found on page 54.
OS1/9/3/53 BEALACH AN DUIN Bealach an Duin Bealach an Duin Bealach an Duin Peter Turner Archibald Cameron Adam Walker Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] Mc Farlan, Arroquhar 010 This name is applied to an opening through "Doune Hill," and signifies "A pass through the hill.
OS1/9/3/53 DOUNE HILL Doune Hill Doune Hill Doune Hill Doune Hill Peter Turner, Auchengavin Archibald Cameron, Doune Adam Walker, Glenmallochan James Galbraith, Edentaggart 010 A large hill of considerable height with two distinct features. the east conical and west ridged. It is situated in the north of the parish of "Luss." the north slope which falls to "Glen Douglas and "Cona Ghlean", is steep and rocky and the south which falls to the head of "Glen Mallochan, is easy of ascent. The hollow space or opening between the two features is called Bealach an Duin. Doune is supposed to be a corruption of Dun.
OS1/9/3/53 [Page] 53 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Bealach an Dùin:] Bealach; A defile, A passage, the pass or gorge of a mountain. (G) [Gaelic] Dùin. (G. [Gaelic]) from Dùn. A hill, a mount. "Bealach an Dùin", The pass of the hill.
OS1/9/3/54 SITH MOR Sith Mor Sith Mor Sith Mor Peter Turner, Auchengavin Archibald Cameron, Doune Adam Walker, Glenmallochan 010 This name is applied to the south east slope of "Doune Hill." Extending from the head of "Glen Mallochan" to "Glen Douglas"
OS1/9/3/54 [Page] 54 County Dumbarton Sìth, (G. [Gaelic]) A mountain, a hill Mòr, (G. [Gaelic]) Great, high, lofty.
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OS1/9/3/56 MID HILL Mid Hill Mid Hill Mid Hill Peter Turner Adam Walker Archibald Cameron 010 A hill of considerable height ridge topped. Situated between "Ben Dhubh" and "Ben Eich". Its East slope falls to "Glen Striddle", and its west to Glen Mallochan. it forms a conspicuous feature in the district
OS1/9/3/56 COIRE NA H-EANACHAN Coire na h-Eanachan Coire na h-Eanachan Coire na h-Eanachan Coire na h-Eanachan Peter Turner Adam Walker John McFarlane Inverbeg Inn Archibald Cameron 010 A name applied to a large coire at the northern extremity of "Ben Dhubh" its sides are steep and rocky from which flows a good stream bearing no name, and falls after pursuing a northerly direction into Glen Douglas. (See 10 B Trace 1) about 70 chains west of Inverbeg Inn. The signification of the name cannot be obtained.
OS1/9/3/56 COIRE CARLAIG Coire Carlaig Coire Carlaig Coire Carlaig Peter Turner Adam Walker Archibald Cameron 010 This name is applied to a hollow in the north end of "Mid Hill" it is of a circular shape. the sides are steep and rocky. The name relates to wool.
OS1/9/3/56 [Page] 56 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Coire na h-Eanachan:] Coire, (G.) [Gaelic]. A circular hollow surrounded with hills, a mountain dell Eanachan, (G) [Gaelic] dim: [diminutive] of Eanach, relating to wool Should it not be "Coire nan Eunachan". "The hollow of the little birds"? [Below entry for Coire Carlaig:] Càrlaig, (from Càrlag, G. [Gaelic]) A lock of wool, Coire, as above.
OS1/9/3/57 BEINN EICH Ben Eich Ben Eich Ben Eich Ben Eich Peter Turner James Galbraith Adam Walker Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell 010 A large narrow ridge topped hill forming almost a peak at its summit, having "Ben Lochain" at the northern extremity. The west slope is steep and falls to "Gleann na Caorruinn", and the east, which is called Leachd a' Bhuic is very steep and rocky and falls to "Glen Mallochan" It forms one of the principal features in the parish and is situated near the farmhouse of Edentaggart, the name signifies the Horse Mountain.
OS1/9/3/57 LEACHD A' BHUIC Leachd a' Bhuic Leachd a' Bhuic Leachd a' Bhuic Leachd a' Bhuic Leachd a' Bhuic Duncan MacFarlane, Hill Peter Turner Adam Walker James Galbraith Archibald Cameron 010 This name is applied to the Eastern Slope of "Ben Eich. is well known and signifies the Declivity of the Buck.
OS1/9/3/57 [Page] 57 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Beinn Eich:] Corrected [from Ben to Beinn] at O.S.O. [Ordnance Survey Office] Glasgow "Beinn, G. [Gaelic] A mountain, a hill," "Eich, (from Each,) A horse. G. [Gaelic]" "Ben Eich, - Horse's Hill. [Below entry for Leachd a' Bhuic:] Corrected on plan C.H. Leachd (G. [Gaelic]) A declivity, Bhuic, Gen. Sing: def: [Genitive Singular definite] of Boc, - A roe-buck Leachd a' Bhuic, Declivity of the buck.
OS1/9/3/58 GLEN MALLOCHAN Glen Mallochan Glen Mallochan Glen Mallochan Peter Turner Adam Walker Archibald Cameron 010 A name applied to the glen runing from the junction of "Glen Luss, and "Gleann na Caorriunn" to the southern base of "Doune Hill" It is formed on the east by "Mid Hill. and on the west by Ben Eich. & having an opening to "Glen Douglas" but bears the name no furthur than the southern base of Doune Hill on which the stream rises that runs through it and falls into "Luss Water", near "Glenmallochan" farmhouse. The stream is of considerable size, bearing no name. The signification of the name is not known.
OS1/9/3/58 [Page] 58 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Glen Mallochan:] Gleann Malaichean The valley of the sacks or burthens ?
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OS1/9/3/60 BEINN DUBH Ben Dhubh Ben Dhubh Ben Dhubh Ben Dhubh Ben Dhubh Montague Martin Esqr. Peter Turner Adam Walker, Glenmallochan Coll Lindsay Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell 010 A mountain in the north east of the parish of Luss. The north side, which falls to "Glen Douglas is steep though not generally rocky. The east and west sides are the most difficult of ascent. It rises to a great height, and forms one of the principal features in the district. On it are two unimportant features. Dun Mor and Dun-an-t'Seileich, the name signifies the Dark Mountain.
OS1/9/3/60 KINLOCH WELL Kinloch Well Kinloch Well Kinloch Well Peter Turner, Auchengavin Coll Lindsay Culag Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell Luss 010 This name is applied to a spring issuing out of a rock, on the side of the turnpike road from "Dumbarton to Inverary". and at which there is a rough hewen trough for watering horses. At this place General Wade erected a stone and drinking cup. The stone bearing an inscription, but of neither any part now remains. It is situated about a mile north of the farmhouse of "Culag".
OS1/9/3/60 [Page] 60 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Beinn Dubh:] Corrected [from Ben to Beinn] at O.S.O. [Ordnance Survey Office] Glasgow Beinn, (G) [Gaelic] A mountain Dhubh (G. [Gaelic] from Dubh) Black, dark Rule. An adjective beginning with d, preceded by a noun masculine or feminine ending in -n or -t is always plain in both numbers as nighean dònn, Na coin dubha, Ceit dònn, Beinn dubh, &c. Forbes Grammar p [page] 197
OS1/9/3/61 GLEN STRIDDLE Glen Striddle Glen Striddle Glen Striddle Adam Walker Peter Turner Coll Lindsay 010 A small glen branching of "Glen Luss" at "Glenmallochan" farmhouse. Having no opening at its head, and formed by "Ben Dhubh", on the East and "Mid Hill" on the West the stream which falls into "Luss Water" bears the same name.
OS1/9/3/61 GLENMALLOCHAN Glenmallochan Glenmallochan Glenmallochan Glenmallochan Adam Walker Peter Turner Montague Martin, Esqr., Factor Coll Lindsay 010 A good farm house with large sheep grazing. the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet] and occupied by Adam Walker. The derivation of this name is not known.
OS1/9/3/61 TOM NA GLAS Tom-na-Glas Tom-na-Glas Tom-na-Glas Tom-na-Glas Coll Lindsay Peter Turner Adam Walker John MacLellan, Moledruich 010 A small cothouse, the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet], and occupied by Duncan Buchanan. Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan supposes this name is corrupted from Tom-na-clais the furrowed knoll.
OS1/9/3/61 [Page] 61 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Tom-na-glas:] Not to be changed see reason why page 3 "Tom, (G. [Gaelic]) a hill; a knoll, Clais (G. [Gaelic] from Clas), a furrow, "Glas", (G [Gaelic]), Grey. Tom na glas is not good Gaelic
OS1/9/3/62 TOM BUIDHE Tom Buidhe Tom Buidhe Tom Buidhe Tom Buidhe Colin MacKay Duncan McFarlan, Strone Peter McGregor Finlay Sinclair 009 A name signifying The Yellow Hill applied to a slight eminence on the West slope of "Ben Mheannach".
OS1/9/3/62 TOMBUOY (Ruin) Tombuoy (Ruins) Colin MacKay Duncan McFarlan, Strone Peter McGregor Finlay Sinclair 009 The ruins of a farm house situated at the foot of the eminence, "Tom Buidhe", of which name it is a corruption. It is on the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart [Baronet].
OS1/9/3/62 ALLT A' CHLEIBH Allt a' Chleibh Allt a' Chleibh Allt a' Chleibh Colin MacKay Finlay Sinclair Peter MacGregor, Glenmallan 009 A good stream rising off the top of "Ben Mheannach," and, flowing down the side of that mountain through a very rugged channel, falls into "Loch Long" a quarter of a mile above "Finnart".
OS1/9/3/62 [Page] 62 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Tom Buidhe:] "Tom Buidhe," (G) [Gaelic], Yellow Hill. [Below entry for Allt a' Chléibh:] "Allt a' Chléibh," Breast of the mountain stream.
OS1/9/3/63 ARDDARROCH Arddarroch Arddarroch Arddarroch John White Esqr Proprietor Duncan Campbell, Whistlefield Peter McGregor 009 A superior mansion house with a portion of ornamental ground attached. The property of the occupier John White Esqr. The name applies to all the houses on the West side of the road, which are cottages belonging to the grounds. The word House is not used in connection with this name, which is a corruption of Ard a promontory and Darach oak.
OS1/9/3/63 FINNART Finnart Finnart Finnart Finnart Finnard Agent's advertisement in Glasgow Herald New Statistical Account Peter McGregor Duncan McFarlan, Strone Johnston's Co. [County] Map 009 A superior mansion house with extensive pleasure grounds attached, Offices are adjacent to the house. Like the above the word House is not used in connection with the name. It is at present the property of Mrs. McGregor but is intended to be sold.
OS1/9/3/63 [Page] 63 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Arddarroch:] "Ard darrach," Oak promontory "Darach - An oak" - (G) [Gaelic]
OS1/9/3/64 CREAGAN AN T-SEILICH Creag-an t' seileich Creag-an t' seileich Creag-an t' seileich Creag-an t' seileich Peter Turner Adam Walker Coll Lindsay Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan 010 This name is applied to a small precipice of rocks, on the southern slope of "Ben Dhubh", about 40 chains north of "Tom-na-glas.
OS1/9/3/64 CREAGANTUIE Craig-en-tuie Craig-en-tuie Craig-en-tuie Craig-en-tuie Montague Martin, Esqr. Coll Lindsay Peter Turner 010 An old farm house now used as a smearing house. the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet] and occupied by Coll Lindsay. Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan supposes the name to be a corruption of Creag-an-t'shuide. The resting rock.
OS1/9/3/64 DUN AN T-SEILICH Dun-an-t'Seileich Dun-an-t'Seileich Dun-an-t'Seileich Dun-an-t'Seileich Dun-an-t'Seileich Peter Turner Adam Walker Coll Lindsay John MacLellan Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan, 010 A small knoll on the south slope of "Ben Dhubh", about 20 chains north of Tom-na-glas. the name signifies, the Willow hill or knoll.
OS1/9/3/64 [Page] 64 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Dun an t-Seilich:] Corrected at Glasgow "Dun, a knoll; a hillock; a mount, (G). [Gaelic] Seilich, (from Sileach.) A willow, "Dun an t-Seileich," - The willow knoll. [Below entry for Creagan an t-Seilich:] Corrected at Glasgow Creag, (G) [Gaelic] a rock
OS1/9/3/65 CHAPEL (Remains of) Chapel (Remains of) Chapel (Remains of) Chapel (Remains of) Chapel (Remains of) Chapel (Remains of) Adam Walker Peter Turner James Galbraith, Edentaggart Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan, Arroquhar 010 This name is applied to a ruin, about 33 chains East of "Glenmallochan" farm house. The walls only remain and are about 2 feet in height, and 3 in breadth.The length of the ruin is 30 feet and 21 in width. There is no record of its date. Several of the principal stones were used in building "Glenmallochan" house. In the north wall several coins were found in 1837, two gold and several silver. The gold ones belong to the Reign of James IV King of Scotland, who reigned in the 15th Century. They are now in possession of Sir James Colquhoun, Bart. [Baronet], who in 1852, erected a stone on the western wall, bearing the following inscriptions, in Latin and Gaelic. Latin In Memoriam Pristinae. Pietatis Super.has.aedes Olim.Deo.Sacratas. Nunc.eheu!funditus.dilapidatas. Hoc.monumentum. Ponendum. curavit. Jacobus Dominus de Colquhoun Et de Luss MDCCLII Gaelic Mar Chuimhne Air crabhachd nan linntean cein Anns an do thogadh Tigh aoraidh an so a bhacoisrigte do Dhia Mo chreach! a nis'na làraich luim Chuireadh an leac-chuimhne so suas Le Seumas Triath Chloim-a-chombuich agus Ridire Luis 1852
OS1/9/3/65 [Page] 65 County Dumbarton
OS1/9/3/66 CULAG Culag Culag Culag Culag Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Rev. [Reverend] D. Campbell Coll Lindsay, Farmer Rent Receipt 010 A good farm steading the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet]. This name signifies a small nook.
OS1/9/3/66 DUN MOR Dun Mor Dun Mor Dun Mor Dun Mor Rev [Reverend] D. Campbell Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Coll Lindsay Peter Turner 010 A name applied to two small rocky knolls, at the foot of "Ben Dhubh," on the side of the T.P. [Turn Pike] road from Dumbarton to Inverary, about 30 chains north of "Uray".
OS1/9/3/66 URAY Uray Uray Uray Montague Martin Esqr. Factor Peter Turner Coll Lindsay 010 An old Cothouse the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart [Baronet]. Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan supposes this name to be a corruption of Urfhaiche which signifies Newfield.
OS1/9/3/66 [Page] 66 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Culag:] "Cùlag, (G) [Gaelic]. May signify a little nook Cùl. The back of anything; as "Cùl na beinne" The back, or secluded part of the mountain, Ag, a diminutive termination. [Below entry for Dun Mor:] Dùn. A hillock, a mount Mòr. Great. Gael. [Gaelic] [Below entry for Uray:] Ùr, (G) [Gaelic] New, fair, &c. Fhairhe (G. [Gaelic] from Fairhe) A field
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OS1/9/3/68 GLEANN NA CAORRUINN Gleann-na-Caorruinn Gleann-ma-Caorruinn Gleann-ma-Caorruinn Gleann-ma-Caorruinn Glen Macurn Rev [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan, Arroquhar Rev [Reverend] D. Campbell, Luss Peter Turner, Auchengavin Colin MacKay, Gleann-na-Caorruinn Johnston's County Map 010 A valley extending nearly five miles in length. It leaves "Glen Gillanoch" (Johnston's Co. [County] Map) nearly a mile south of "Craggan" and rises gently to the source of "Luss Water" at which part the hill on the South presents a very rugged aspect. At this point its bottom is flat and about 15 chains in breadth. It then falls for about a mile when it becomes narrower and the hills rising from each side spring up very abruptly. Passing the dwelling house of "Gleann-na-Caorruinn" the bottom again becomes flat which continues to the point of junction with "Gleann Molachan" &"Glen of Luss". The name signifies the Glen of the rowan tree or mountain ash. The article "na" which should be retained, has become corrupted and is now always used as "ma".
OS1/9/3/68 [Page] 68 Co [County] Dumbarton [na/ma] See Descriptive Rks [Remarks] Gleann, (G. [Gaelic]), A glen, a valley Caorruinn, nom: pl: [nominative plural] of Caorrunn, the Mountain Ash, Ma, prep: [preposition] about, around, (G) [Gaelic].
OS1/9/3/69 GLEANN MA CAORUINN Gleann-na-Caorruinn Gleann-ma-Caorruinn Gleann-ma-Caorruinn Gleann-ma-Caorruinn Rev [Reverend]. Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Rev [Reverend]. D. Campbell Peter Turner Colin MacKay 010 An inferior dwelling house, on Luss estate, occupied by a shepherd. The spelling of this name to be the same as the glen in which it is situated. (See Gleann na Caorruinn).
OS1/9/3/69 SRON NA SPEIREIG Sron-na-Speireig Sron-na-Speireig Sron-na-Speireig Rev [Reverend]. Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Rev [Reverend]. D. Campbell Peter Turner 010 A narrow topped arm, nearly flat on the top, projecting from the east side of "Ben Chaorach" and of considerably less height than that mountain. The name signifies the projection of the sparrow hawk.
OS1/9/3/69 EDENTAGGART Edentaggart Edentaggart Edentaggart Rev [Reverend]. D. Campbell James Galbraith, Farmer Peter Turner 010 A good farm steading with a large sheep farm attached the property of Sir James Colquhoun, Bart [Baronet]. This name though corrupted is known by all to signify the face of the hill belonging to the priest (Eudann t' Sagairt) but now only appears in writing as Edentaggart.
OS1/9/3/69 [Page] 69 Co [County] Dumbarton [In left hand margin beside Gleann ma Caoruinn:] Note. The name to be written on plate without hyphens - See Col. [Colonel] Cameron's ] minute [Below entry for Sron na Speireig:] "Sròn, (G) [Gaelic] A nose, a promontory or headland Speireig, from Speireag, a sparrow hawk Na, the. - "The sparrow hawk's promontory". Sròn nan Speireag Is it not likely the circumstance of its being the resort of sparrow hawks that gave rise to this name, and not from one sparrow hawk? [Below entry for Edentaggart, but referring back to the authorities for Sron na Speireig:] According to the authorities the name is in the singular form and perfectly correct. JB Major
OS1/9/3/70 COIRE FUAR Coire Fuar Coire Fuar Coire Fuar Corafuar Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Peter Turner Colin MacKay Statistical Account 010 A minor feature in the extensive dell "Coire Coingheil." Its appearance is not remarkable and the depression slight. The Statistical Account erroneously applies this name to the top of the hill. The name signifies the Cold Corrie.
OS1/9/3/70 COIRE CANN Coire Cann Coire Cann Coire Cann Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Peter Turner Colin MacKay 010 An extensive dell sweeping round from "Creag-an-leinibh," to the end of "Coilleeughain Hill" Its sides are spotted with small rocks and it falls to a great depth. The signification of this name is not known
OS1/9/3/70 [Page] 70 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Coire Fuar:] "Coire, (G) [Gaelic]. A mountain dell, a circular hollow surrounded with hills Fuar, (G) [Gaelic]. Cold, chilly [Below entry for Coire Cann:] "Coire, (G) [Gaelic]. See above. "Can. (G) [Gaelic]. White. "Cann, (G) [Gaelic]. A vessel, a full moon.
OS1/9/3/71 COIRE COINGHILL Coire Coingheil Coire Coingheil Coire Coingheil Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Peter Turner Colin MacKay 010 An extensive dell in the side of "Ben Chaorach," extending from one extremity to the other for nearly a mile. Several streams flow over it and unite at its foot. It is very steep but not generally rocky. It derives its name from the violent manner in which the wind sweeps round it.
OS1/9/3/71 SHEILING BURN Sheiling Burn Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Peter Turner Colin MacKay 010 A good stream bearing its name from the junction of two streams at the foot of "Coire Coingheil". In its course it passes two ruins three quarters of a mile apart and falls into "Luss Water" a mile below "Gleann-na-Caorruinn.
OS1/9/3/71 71 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Coire Coinghill:] "Coire, (G. [Gaelic]). A mountain dell, a hollow between surrounded with hills. Coingheil, from Coingheall, A whirlpool; vortex; a violent agitation, (G. [Gaelic]). gen. sing. [genitive singular] Coinghill
OS1/9/3/72 BEINN CHAORACH Ben Chaorach Ben Chaorach Ben Chaorach Ben Chaorach Benecuirach Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Rev. [Reverend] D. Campbell Peter Turner Colin MacKay Johnston's Co. [County] Map 010 A high and well known mountain on the western boundary of the Parish of Luss. It rises to a great height on all sides & is one of the highest hills in the district where it is situated, Its appearance on the west side is very regular. On the east are two considerable features, the projection "Sron-na-Speireig" and an extensive dell "Coire Coingheil." The general appearance of its range is with the parish boundary. This name signifies the sheep mountain.
OS1/9/3/72 BEALACH A' CHABAIR Bealach-an-Cabair Bealach-an-Cabair Bealach-an-Cabair Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Peter Turner Colin MacKay 010 A slight depression to the south of "Ben Chaorach" passing through the range on which the parish boundary runs
OS1/9/3/72 [Page] 72 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Beinn Chaorach:] Corrected at O.S.O. [Ordnance Survey Office] Glasgow "Beinn, (G) [Gaelic], A mountain; A hill, A pinnacle. Caora, Caorach, A' Chaora, Sheep. Gael. [Gaelic]. Gen. plu. [Genitive plural] Chaorach Beinn Chaorach The Sheep Hill [By entry for Bealach a' Chabair:] Corrected at Glasgow Bealach a' Chabair or plur. [plural] Bealach nan Cabar A noun when immediately preceded by the article suffers some changes in its initial form. 1st The aspirated is assumed by a mas. [masculline] noun in the gen. [genitive] and dat. [dative] sing. [singular] Stewart's Grammar page 138 Forbes Grammar page 66 "Bealach, A defile, a passage, the pass or gorge of a mountain, Gael. [Gaelic]; "Cabair, (from Cabar, G. [Gaelic]) A deer's horn, an antler, Gael. [Gaelic] "An, the." Bealach-an-Cabair, The deer's pass Note In cases like the above it matters little whether it is Bealach an Chabair or Bealach a' Chabair.
OS1/9/3/73 LUSS WATER Luss Water Luss Water Luss Water Rev. [Reverend] D. Campbell Peter Turner Colin MacKay 010 An important stream rising on the boundary between the parishes of Luss and Row, at the highest point of "Gleann-na-Caorruinn" down which glen it flows receiving numerous tributaries. After leaving that glen it continues its course through the "Glen of Luss" and falls into Loch Lomond at Luss village.
OS1/9/3/73 COILLE-EUGHAIN HILL Coille-eughain Hill Coille-eughain Hill Coille-eughain Hill Coille-eughain Hill Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Rev. [Reverend] D. Campbell Peter Turner Colin MacKay 010 A long ridge topped hill of considerable height on the south side of "Luss Water" with which it runs nearly parallel. It has a fine regular appearance on all sides. The greater part of the wood from which it derives its name has been cut down.
OS1/9/3/73 [Page] 73 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Coille-eughain Hill:] "Coille, a wood or grove, (G. [Gaelic]) Eachain, (from Eachain) Smooth cockle, (G) [Gaelic]
OS1/9/3/74 BEINN THARSUINN Ben Tharsuinn Ben Tharsuinn Ben Tharsuinn Bentarsen Colin McKay, Gleann na Caorruinn Duncan McFarlane, Strone Peter Turner, Auchengavin Johnston's Co. [County] Map 010 A high and regular shaped hill ranging from North to South. It is situated at the South end of "Ben Chaorach" with which it is connected. The position of the hill gives rise to the name.
OS1/9/3/74 [Page] 74 Co [County] Dumbarton "Ben" - Tharsuinn, (G. [Gaelic]), transverse Corrected at Glasgow
OS1/9/3/75 [Page] 75 [Blank page]
OS1/9/3/76 BEINN RUISG Ben Ruisg Ben Ruisg Ben Ruisg Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Peter Turner Colin MacKay 010 A high ridge topped mountain two miles west from the village of Luss. It is of considerable importance and rises to a great height. On all sides it is of regular appearance. From its North east end "Sron-an-laoigh" projects for a considerable distance. Its east side is sprinkled with a few rocks. The name is descriptive of the mountain and signifies the bare or barren mountain.
OS1/9/3/76 [Page] 76 County Dumbarton Beinn, (G. [Gaelic]). A mountain Rùisg, (G. [Gaelic]). from Rusg. An external covering; a rind; skin, or husk. Corrected at Glasgow
OS1/9/3/77 CREAG AN LEINIBH Creag-an-Leinibh Creag-an-Leinibh Creag-an-Leinibh Creag-an-Leinibh Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Rev. [Reverend] D. Campbell Peter Turner Colin MacKay 010 A prominent precipice of bold and irregular rocks sometimes forming extensive fissures. It is situated at the end of "Coire Cann" and derives its name from a tradition of a child having been carried away and taken to this place by an eagle.
OS1/9/3/77 COIRE A' CHNUIC Coire-an-Chnoich Coire-an-Chnoich Rev. [Reverend] Dr. [Doctor] McFarlan Peter Turner 010 A considerable and prominent depression in the North West end of "Ben Ruisg." This name signifies The Corrie of the Knoll.
OS1/9/3/77 [Page] 77 Co [County] Dumbarton [Below entry for Creag an Leinibh:] "Creag, (G) [Gaelic]. A rock; a crag Leinibh, from Leanabh, A child an, the - "The Child's Crag." [Below entry for Coire a' Chnoich:] "Coire, (G) [Gaelic]. A circular hollow surrounded with hills, a mountain dell. Chnoic, from Cnoc, A knoll; a hillock, a hill. a', the - Cnoc, The letter n of this word sounds like r in Gaelic.
OS1/9/3/78 ALLT DORNAN Allt Dornan Allt Dornan Peter Turner Rev. [Reverend] D. Campbell 010 A large stream rising in "Coire Eoineoin." flowing in a north easterly direction and falls into "Luss Water." near "Auchengavin," The signification of this name is not known.
OS1/9/3/78 [Page] 78 County Dumbarton Allt, - (G) [Gaelic] - A mountain stream
OS1/9/3/79 COIRE EOINEIN Coire Eoinein Coire Eoinein Coire Eoinein Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell Peter Turner Duncan McFarlane 010 This name is applied to a large Coire on the east slope of "Ben Ruisg." Its south and west sides are very steep and rocky. It forms one of the principal features in the district. Out of it rises the Allt Dornan. the name signifies the Birds Coire.
OS1/9/3/79 MAOL REAMHAR Maol Reamhar Peter Turner 010 A small hill flat topped situated between the head of the Crom Allt and Allt Dornan the name signifies the Fat hill from its flat like appearance This name is now known only to the authority quoted
OS1/9/3/79 [Page] 79 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Coire Eoinein:] "Coire, A circular hollow surrounded with hills, a mountain dell." Eòinein, from Eun, - a bird. [Below entry for Maol Ramhar] "Maol, The brow of a rock; a cape, a promontory. Reamhar, Plump, great, greasy
OS1/9/3/80 CREAG CAIT Creag Cait Creag Cait Creag Cait Peter Turner Duncan McFarlane Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell 010 This is applied to a precipice of rocks. On the side of "Crom Allt" about 15 chains south of the junction of the "Crom Allt" and Allt Dornan the name signifies the Cats Craig.
OS1/9/3/80 SRON AN LAOIGH Sron an Laoigh Sron an Laoigh Sron an Laoigh Peter Turner Duncan McFarlane John McLellan 010 This name is applied to a projection off the north shoulder of "Ben Ruisg", and considerably lower in height. The name signifies the calfs point or nose.
OS1/9/3/80 SRON AN LAOIGH BURN Sron an Laoigh Burn Sron an Laoigh Burn Sron an Laoigh Burn Peter Turner Duncan McFarlane John McLellan 010 A good stream rising in Coire a' Chnoich pursuing an Easterly direction and falls into the Allt Dornan about 7 chains South of the junction of the "Crom Allt" with the Allt Dornan.
OS1/9/3/80 [Page] 80 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Creag Cait:] "Creag - A craig, rock, &c (G.) [Gaelic]. Cait, gen: [genitive] of Cat, a cat, Gael. [Gaelic]. [Below entry for Sron an Laoigh:] Sròn, G. [Gaelic] - A nose; a promontory; point, Gael. [Gaelic] Laogh, Gen: [Genitive] Laoigh, - A calf, Gael. [Gaelic]
OS1/9/3/81 CRUACH DHUBH Cruach Dhubh Peter Turner, Auchengavin 010 A low ridge topped hill, at the west of the village of "Luss", on the eastern slope slate is extensively wrought and on the north end of the top is a forked feature bearing the name of Stob Gobhlach, which is generally applied to the whole hill, by the people in the neighbourhood. Cruach Dhubh being now only known to the authority quoted.
OS1/9/3/81 STOB GOBHLACH Stob Gobhlach Stob Gobhlach Stob Gobhlach Peter Turner Duncan McFarlane, Camstraddan Hill John McLellan, Moledruich 010 A name applied to two rocky knolls on the northern shoulder of "Cruach Dhubh", which in the neighbourhood is better known as "Stob gobhlach."
OS1/9/3/81 CROM ALLT Crom Allt Crom Allt Crom Allt Peter Turner Duncan McFarlane Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell Luss 010 A good stream rising on the eastern slope of "Maol Remehar" pursuing a northerly direction, and falls into "Allt Dornan", about 55 chains south west of Auchengavin. the name signifies Crooked burn.
OS1/9/3/81 [Page] 81 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Cruach Dubh:] "Cruach, A high hill, - Gael [Gaelic]. Dhubh, (G.) [Gaelic] Black Dhubh nom. sing. fem. [nominative singular feminine] [Below entry for Stob Gobhlach:] Stob, - A stake, (G) [Gaelic] Gobhlach, Forked, pronged (G.) [Gaelic] [Below entry for Crom Allt:] "Cròm, (G). [Gaelic] Crooked, bent, cut. Allt, (G). [Gaelic] A mountain stream.
OS1/9/3/82 AUCHINVENNAL HILL Auchenvennel Hill Auchenvennel Hill Auchenvennel Hill Archibald McLachlan Peter Turner John Millar 013 A long ridged topped hill about a mile south of "Ben Chaorich" and near "Balavoulin". it has fine sloping sides and is of considerable height.
OS1/9/3/82 ALLT A' BHAILE-MHUILINN Allt Bhaile a' Mhuilinn Allt Bhaile a' Mhuilinn Allt Bhaile a' Mhuilinn Peter Turner John Millar Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell 013 A large stream rising on the northern slope of "Balcnock", pursuing a South Eastrly direction and falls into "Fruin Water", about a quarter mile south of "Balavoulin" farm house. This name signifies The Mill town burn.
OS1/9/3/82 [Page] 82 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Auchinvennal Hill:] Assimilated to Auchinvennal on Plan 13/5 Row JB Major [Below entry for Allt a' Bhaile-Mhuilinn:] "Allt - A mountain stream or Burn Bhaile - from Baile, a town Mhuillinn, from Muilleann, A mill, a' the "Allt Bhaile a' Mhuilinn," The Mill town Burn. To be written as corrected at O.S.O. [Ordnance Survey Office] Glasgow See Name Book for Row Ph [Parish] on page 48 Note - These names to be written alike on the plans. J.C.
OS1/9/3/83 BALCNOCK Balcnock Balcnock Balcnock Balnock Peter Turner John Millar Archibald McLachlan. Balavoulin Johnston's County Map 010 This name is applied to a hill of considerable height in the west of the Parish of "Luss" the boundary between that parish and that of Row, passes along, this hill, which is long and ridged topped. It forms one of the principal features in the district. This name is derived from Baile, and Cnoc.
OS1/9/3/83 COIRE CUINNE Coire Cuinne Coire Cuinne Coire Cuinne Peter Turner John Millar Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell 013 A name applied to a large Coire or hollow, on the eastern summit of "Balcnock" Its sides are steep and rocky. the name signifies the narrow, or angular Coire, and is a corruption of Coire Cumhann.
OS1/9/3/83 ALLT A' MHUILT Allt a' Mhuilt Allt a' Mhuilt Allt a' Mhuilt Peter Turner Rev. [Reverend] Duncan Campbell John Millar 013 A small stream rising at the head of "Glen Finlas" pursuing a southerly direction, and falls into "Finlas Water" about 2 miles north west of "Shemore". This name signifies the Stream of the Wedder.
OS1/9/3/83 [Page] 83 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Balcnock:] "Baile," (G) [Gaelic] - A town "Cnoc," (G) [Gaelic] A hill, - "The letter "n" in this word has the sound of r; as if written Croc. [Below entry for Coire Cuinne:] Coire, A mountain dell, a circular hollow surrounded with hills. Cuinne, (G) [Gaelic] - A corner, an angle, a meeting. [Below entry for Allt a' Mhuilt:] "Allt, and Mhuilt, from Muilt, A wedder. "Allt a' Mhuilt," The Wedder Burn.
OS1/9/3/83 A wedder is a wether, or castrated ram.
OS1/9/3/84 TOM NA CONA Tom na Cona Tom na Cona Tom na Cona Peter Turner Auchengavin John Millar, Row Duncan McFarlane Hill 013 This name is applied to a flat circular topped hill situated about 40 chains west of the "Free Church Manse".
OS1/9/3/84 CREACHAN HILL Creachan Hill Creachan Hill Creachan Hill Peter Turner John Millar John Campbell Luss 013 A name applied to a ridged topped hill of considerable height about a mile south of "Ben Ruisg". Its southern slope is steep and rocky and falls to "Glen Finlas" the name is well known and forms a conspicuous feature in the district.
OS1/9/3/84 [Page] 84 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Tom na Cona:] "Tom na Cona", (G) [Gaelic] The moss-crop hill. Conach fem [feminine] ; Cona mas. [masculine] Therefore it should be Tom na Cona' contraction of Conaich or Tom a' Chona The latter being a mas. [masculine] noun. [Below entry for Creachan Hill:] "Creachan Hill," Freebooters' Hill.
OS1/9/3/85 ALLT NA H-AINNIRE Allt na h-Ainnire Allt na h-Ainnire Allt na h-Ainnire Rev [Reverend] Duncan Campbell Peter Turner John Millar 013 A small stream rising on the west side of "Creachan Hill" pursuing a southerly direction and falls into "Finlas Water" about a mile and half north west of "Shemore". This name signifies the Maiden's Stream.
OS1/9/3/85 [Page] 85 County Dumbarton "Allt," and "na h-Ainnire," G.D.f [Gaelic Derivative feminine] - from Ainnir, A maid. Gael. [Gaelic] John Bayly Major R.E. [Royal Engineers]
OS1/9/3/86 OS1/9/3 Parish of Arrochar DUMBARTONSHIRE (6 inch scale) SHEETS VII, VIII, IX, X, XIII. [7, 8, 9, 10, 13.]
OS1/9/3/87 [Page] 87 Name -- Sheet -- Plan -- Page Ardmay -- 7 -- b -- 1 An t'Sreang -- 8 -- a -- 13 Allt Chroit a' Chladaich -- 8 -- a -- 15 Allt Stuchd an t-Iobart -- 8 -- a -- 16 Allt Derigan -- 10 -- b -- 41 Allt Darach -- 10 -- b -- 49 Allt Innse -- 10 -- b -- 50 Auchengaich Burn -- 10 -- b -- 51 Allt Garbh -- 10 -- b -- 51 Allt a' Chleibh -- 10 -- b -- 62 Arddarroch -- 10 -- b -- 63 Allt Darnan -- 10 -- c --78 Auchenvennel -- 13 -- a -- 82 Allt a'Bhaile a'Mhuilinn -- 13 -- a -- 82 Allt a'Mhuilt -- 13 -- a -- 83 Allt n h-Ainnire -- 13 -- b -- 85 Benreoch House -- 8 -- a -- 9 Ben Reoch -- 8 -- a -- 17 Ben Bhreachd -- 8 -- c -- 27 Ben a' Mhanaich -- 10 -- b -- 40 Ben Bhreach -- 10 -- b -- 40 Bealach an t-Saic -- 10 -- b -- 46 Binnean nam Boc -- 10 -- b -- 49 Ben Lochain -- 10 -- a -- 52 Bealach an Duin -- 10 -- a -- 53 Ben Eich -- 10 -- a -- 57 Ben Dubh -- 10 -- b -- 60 Ben Chaorach -- 10 -- c -- 72 Bealach an Cabair -- 10 -- c -- 72 Ben Tharsuinn -- 10 -- c -- 74 Ben Rùisg -- 10 -- c -- 76 Balcnock -- 10 -- c -- 83 Creagan -- 7 -- d -- 3 Creag an Sithe -- 7 -- d -- 3 Creagan Hill -- 7 -- d -- 4 Church -- 8 -- a -- 7 Coire Bhuilg -- 8 -- a -- 12 Croit a' Chladaich -- 8 -- a -- 12 Cruach an Bhuilg -- 8 -- a -- 18 Coille a' Chorain -- 8 -- c -- 24 Conaghlean (Ruins) -- 8 -- c -- 28 Cona Ghlean -- 8 -- c -- 28 Camus nan Clais -- 8 -- d -- 31 Culanach (Ruins) -- 9 -- d -- 38 Creag Ennich -- 9 -- b -- 39 Clach Sgoilte -- 9 -- b -- 39 Creag Tharsuinn -- 9 -- b -- 41 Cruach an t-Sithean -- 9 -- b -- 41 Carraig nan Ron or Dog Rock -- 9 -- b -- 42 Coire na h-Eanachan -- 10 -- a -- 56 Coire Carlaig -- 10 -- a -- 56
OS1/9/3/87 Allr Darach is on Sheet 9, not 10 Auchengaich Burn is on Sheets 9 and 12, not 10 Allt Garbh is on Sheet 9, not 10 Allt a' Chleibh is on Sheet 9, not 10 Arddarroch is on Sheet 9, not 10 Allt Darnan should be Allt Dornan Ben a' Mhanaich is on Sheet 9, not 10 Ben Bhreach is on Sheet 9, not 10 Bealach an t-Saic is on Sheet 9, not 10 Binnean nam Boc is on Sheet 9, not 10
OS1/9/3/88 [Page] 88 Name -- Sheet -- Plan -- Page Creagan an t- Seileich -- 10 -- b -- 64 Creagantuie -- 10 -- b -- 64 Chapel (Remains of) -- 10 -- b -- 65 Culag -- 10 -- b -- 66 Coire Fuar -- 10 -- c -- 70 Coire Cann -- 10 -- c -- 70 Coire Coingheil 10 -- c -- 71 Coille-eughain Hill -- 10 -- c -- 73 Creag an Leinibh -- 10 -- c -- 77 Coire a' Chnoich -- 10 -- c -- 77 Coire Eòinein -- 10 -- d -- 79 Creag Cait -- 10 -- d -- 80 Cruach Dubh -- 10 -- d -- 81 Cròm Allt -- 10 -- d -- 81 Coire Cuinne -- 13 -- a -- 83 Creachan Hill -- 13 -- b -- 84 Douglas Water -- 8 -- c -- 23 Doune -- 8 -- c -- 27 Doune Hill -- 10 -- a -- 53 Dun an t-Seileich -- 10 -- b -- 64 Dùn Mòr -- 10 -- b -- 66 Edentaggart -- 10 -- c -- 69 Firkin T.P. [Turn Pike] -- 8 -- b -- 19 Firkin -- 8 -- b -- 20 Firkin Point -- 8 -- b -- 20 Firkin Burn -- 8 -- d -- 32 Faoileann -- 9 -- b -- 45 Fruin Water -- 9 -- b -- 47 Finnart -- 10 -- b -- 63 Gorten -- 7 -- d -- 3 Glen Douglas -- 8 -- c -- 29 Glen Mallan -- 9 -- b -- 37 Glenmallan -- 9 -- d -- 38 Glen Mallochan -- 10 -- a -- 58 Glen Striddle -- 10 -- b -- 61 Glenmallochan -- 10 -- b -- 61 Gleann ma Caorruinn -- 10 -- c -- 68 Gleann ma Caorruinn -- 10 -- c -- 69 Gortean na Leirg -- 9 -- b -- 44 Gleann Cùlanach -- 9 -- b -- 41a High Morlaggan -- 7 -- b -- 1 Invereoch Cottage -- 8 -- a -- 8 Invergroin -- 8 -- c -- 24 Inbhir a' Leachan -- 8 -- c -- 27 Inveruglas -- 8 -- d -- 35 Inverbeg Inn -- 8 -- d -- 35 Kirkfield Cottage -- 8 -- a -- 7 Ferry -- 8 -- d -- 36 Kinloch Well -- 10 -- b -- 60 Lochan Uaine, or Fairy Loch -- 8 -- d -- 32 Leachd a' Bhuic -- 10 -- a -- 57
OS1/9/3/88 Finnart is on Sheet 9, not 10 as entered here.
OS1/9/3/89 [Page] 89 Name -- Sheet -- Plan -- Page Luss Water -- 10 -- c -- 73 Morlaggan -- 7 -- b -- 2 Mansfield -- 8 -- a -- 8 Manse -- 8 -- a -- 9 Monadh Tighe na Laraich -- 8 -- a -- 13 Maol Odhar -- 9 -- b -- 48 Maol a' Fheidh -- 9 -- b -- 48 Mid Hill -- 10 -- a -- 56 Maol Reamhar -- 10 -- d -- 79 Preas Seileich (Ruin) -- 7 -- d -- 4 Portincaple Ferry -- 9 -- b -- 44 Portincaple -- 9 -- b -- 45 Rudha Glas -- 7 -- a -- 9 Rudha Ban -- 8 -- b -- 19 Rudha Dubh -- 8 -- b -- 19 Robert the Bruce's Tree -- 8 -- b -- 21 Rudha Mor -- 8 -- d -- 32 Stuckivoulich -- 8 -- a -- 10 Stuckgown House -- 8 -- a -- 11 Stuckgown Burn -- 8 -- a -- 11 Stuchd an t-Iobairt -- 8 -- b -- 20 Stob Gobhlach -- 8 -- d -- 31 Strone T.P. [Turn Pike] -- 9 -- b -- 37 Stronmallanach -- 9 -- b -- 38 Strone Mallanach -- 9 -- d -- 38 Stuchd Bhan -- 10 -- a -- 52 Sith Mor -- 10 -- a -- 54 Sròn na Speireig -- 10 -- c -- 69 Sheiling Burn -- 10 -- c -- 71 Sron an Laoigh -- 10 -- d -- 80 Sron an Laoigh Burn -- 10 -- d -- 80 Stob Gobhlach -- 10 -- d -- 81 Tayness Cottage -- 8 -- a -- 8 Tigh na Làraich -- 8 -- a -- 10 Tullich Hill -- 8 -- a -- 15 Tullich -- 8 -- c -- 24 Tigh na Craige -- 9 -- b -- 45 The Strone -- 9 -- b -- 46 Tom na Glas -- 10 -- b -- 61 Tom Buidhe -- 10 -- b -- 62 Tombuoy (Ruin) -- 10 -- b -- 62 Tom na Cona -- 13 -- b -- 84 Urach -- 9 -- b -- 43 Uray -- 10 -- b -- 66
OS1/9/3/89 Stronmallanach is on Page 37, not 38 Tom Buidhe is on Sheet 9, not 10 Tom Buoy is on Sheet 9, not 10