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Dunbartonshire volume 12

Page List of names as written Various modes of spelling Authorities for spelling Situation Description remarks Continued entries/extra info
OS1/9/12/1 INCHCONNACHAN Inchconnachan Inchconnachan Inchconnachan Montague Martin Esqr. John Millar Peter Turner 010 This name applies to an Island of considerable extent, having no important features, containing a quantity of copse wood but principally planted with fir the name is a corruption of "Innes na Chombach," Colquhouns Island the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet]
OS1/9/12/1 FLOATING ISLAND Floating Island Floating Island Floating Island Floating Island Montague Martin Esqr. John Millar Peter Turner John Blair, Ardess 010 Applied to a small islet, near the south west extremity of "Inchconnachan", generally covered when the Loch is flooded, hence the name, which is well known and generally recognised by good authorities both in the locality and beyond it. This is not a Floating Island but the people as stated by the last authority have a belief that it once was a floating Island till by some unknown manner it became fixed at the place it now stands.
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OS1/9/12/2 CREAGAN DUBHA Creagan Dubha Creagan Dubha Creagan Dubha Montague Martin Esqr. Factor John Millar Peter Turner 010 This name is applied to several small rocks in Loch Lomond, situated about 20 chains west of the western Extremity of "Inchlonaig". the name signifies the Black Rocks.
OS1/9/12/2 FRAOCH EILEAN Fraoch Eilean Fraoch Eilean Fraoch Eilean Montague Martin Esqr. John Millar Peter Turner 010 A small Island, with a rocky shore and planted with fir trees, situated about half a mile north of Inchtavannach, and nearly opposite Luss. the name signifies the Heather Isle.
OS1/9/12/2 EILEAN DARAICH Eilean Daraich Eilean Daraich Eilean Daraich John Millar Peter Turner Donald Watt 010 A small Isle off the west point of Inchlonaig. it is principally a flat rock. with a few trees (oak) the name signifies Oak Island
OS1/9/12/2 EILEAN NA H-AON CRAOIBHE Eilean na h-aon Craoibhe Eilean na h-aon Craoibhe Peter Turner Peter Johnson 010 This name which is not very well known, in the locality, is applied to a Small Isle, about 20 chains east of Fraoch Eilean, the name signifies The one tree Isle.
OS1/9/12/2 [Page] 2 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Creagan Dubha:] Creagan (From Creag G. [Gaelic]) Rocks Dubha (G) [Gaelic] Black [Below entry for Fraoch Eilean:] Fraoch (G) [Gaelic] Heather Eilean (G) [Gaelic[ An Island [Below entry for Eilean Darach:] Eilean (G) [Gaelic] An island Darach (from Darach G [Gaelic]) Oak [Below entry for Eilean na h-aon Craoibhe:] Eilean, An Island "Eilean na h-aon Craoibhe" The one tree Isle The numerals aon, da, a'cheud or an ceud aspirate their nouns as aon phiob, etc. F.G. [Forbes' Grammar?] p. 214
OS1/9/12/3 INCHTAVANACH Inchtavannach Inchtavannach Inchtavannach Montague Martin Esqr. John Millar, Luss Peter Turner, Auchengavin 010 A name applied to a large Island situated on the west side of Loch Lomond, about a mile south of Luss. It is about a mile in length and fully a quarter in breadth clad with copse wood mixed with a few firs. On the southern extremity, there are several arable fields, and a substantial farm house occupied by Archibald McEwen, the northern point is called Ruinn a' Fhraoich, and on the west, about 20 chains south of this point is situated Tom na Clag, a rocky eminence of considerable height. The Island is of a ridge like shape, rising to a height considerably above the Lake. The name is a corruption of "Innis Manaich" Monks Island. the property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet]
OS1/9/12/3 RUINN A' FHRAOICH Ruinn a' Fhraoich Ruinn a' Fhraoich Ruinn a' Fhraoich Montague Martin Esqr. John Millar Peter Turner 010 This name is applied to a rocky heathy point in the north of Inchtavannach, and signifies the heath point. It is a well known name.
OS1/9/12/3 [Page] 3 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Ruinn a' Fhraoich:] "Ruinn" (G) [Gaelic] A promontory, A point Fhraoich (G [Gaelic] from Fraoch) Heath An of the gen. [genitive] is prefixed to nouns mas. [masculine] beginning with d. f. l. n. r. s. t.
OS1/9/12/4 TOM NAN CLAG Tom na Clag Tom na Clag Tom na Clag Tom na Clag New Statistical Account John Millar Peter Turner Robertsons Tourists' Guide 010 Applied to a rocky eminence in the northern part of Inchtavannach. The name signifies the Bell height or Knoll, "as it was on this height that the bell hung with which the old monks summoned the inhabitants of the parishes of Luss and Inchcailliach to prayer." Robertsons Guide. There are no remains of ancient buildings. Nor is the site of such known as the tradition would imply.
OS1/9/12/4 THE STRAITS The Straits The Straits The Straits Montague Martin Esqr. John Millar Peter Turner 010 This name is applied to the narrow portion of the Loch between the Islands of "Inchtavannach" and "Inchconnachan". this name is known at all parts of Loch Lomond and is a particular object to boatmen.
OS1/9/12/4 CLACH A' MHINISTEIR Clach a' Mhinisteir Clach a' Mhinisteir Clach a' Mhinisteir Montague Martin Esqr. John Millar Peter Turner 010 A well known name applied to a sunken rock, visible only when the Loch is at its lowest level, Situated in the Straits, the name signifies The Ministers Stone.
OS1/9/12/4 [Page] 4 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Tom nan Clag:] Tom (G) [Gaelic] a height Clag (G) [Gaelic] A Bell Clag being a mas. [masculine] noun The gen. [genitive] sing. [singular] is Cluig plural Clag. The name should therefore be, if sing. [singular] Tom a' Chluig or if plu. [plural] Tom nan Clag . Note- The final n of the plu. [plural] article nan is often omitted in speaking but not in writing. But the tradition indicates one bell therefore Tom a' Chluig seems to be the proper form. [Tom nan Clag] preferred, it preserving the same sound JB [Below entry for Clach a' Mhinisteir:] Clach (G) [Gaelic] A stone Mhinisteir (G) [Gaelic] A minister
OS1/9/12/5 STOT ISLE Stot Isle Peter Turner, Auchgavin John Millar, Luss Donald Watt, Luss 010 A name applied to a small Isle covered with trees, situated about 10 chains north of the west point of Inchmoan
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OS1/9/12/7 INCHLONAIG Inchlonaig Inchlonaig Inchlonaig Inchlonaig Inchlonaig Montague Martin Esqr. John Millar Peter Turner New Statistical Account Irving's History 011 This name is applied to the northern of the large Islands of Loch Lomond. Situated nearly opposite the "Villiage of Luss". It is of a ridge like shape the Eastern Extremity the highest and of considerable height, thickly studded with Yew Trees, ascribed by tradition, to have been planted by Sir Robert de Bruce. It is used by the proprietor Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet] as a deer park. Contains several sheds, and a substantial dwelling house occupied by the Gamekeeper. the name is a corruption of "Innis Iubhair" Isle of Yew Trees.
OS1/9/12/7 CNOC NA GOIBHRE Cnoc na Gobhair Cnoc na Gobhair Cnoc na Gobhair Peter Turner Archibald Colquhoun Archibald Davie, Inchfad 011 A name applied to a small hill on the South East corner of Inchlonaig and signifies the Goat's Hill.
OS1/9/12/7 [Page] 7 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Cnoc na Goibhre:] But it is more likely that the hill took its name from being the resort of goats than that it was one goat only. See Remarks on Creag na Gabhair in sheet of remarks on Rosneath parish
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OS1/9/12/9 BUCINCH Buckinch Buckinch Buckinch Bucinch Bucinch Mr Jolly, Factor Peter Turner, Auchengavin John Millar, Luss Chalmer's Caledonia New Stat Act [Statistical Account] 011 This name is applied to a Small Island in Loch Lomond situated about 15 chains north of Inchcruin. It contains a quantity of Copse wood but principally planted with fir, the property of Lady Campbell.
OS1/9/12/9 CEARDACH Ceardach Ceardach Ceardach Ceardach Peter Turner John Millar Donald Watt, Luss Archibald Colquhoun, Inchlonaig 011 A small Isle, covered with trees situated about 12 chains East of Buckinch. the name is well known and signifies, Smithy. there is no appearance of the remains of any building to be seen now. proprietor Duke of Montrose.
OS1/9/12/9 INCHCRUIN Inchcruin Inchcruin Inchcruin Inchcruin Mr Jolly, Factor John Millar Peter Turner New Stat Act [Statistical Account] 011 A well known name applied to a large Island in Loch Lomond. Situated about half a mile East of Inchconnachan. It contains a dwelling house and several arable fields. is used by the proprietor Duke of Montrose, as a rabbit warren. the north western Extremity is covered with small trees containing several open spaces for shooting. the name signifies the Round Island.
OS1/9/12/9 [Page] 9 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Bucinch:] Bucinch is considered to be the proper orthography. [Below entry for Ceardach:] An Ceardach See reason for using the article in another Name Book and in Sheet of Remarks
OS1/9/12/10 INCHMOAN Inchmoan Inchmoan Inchmoan Inchmoan Montague Martin Esqr. Peter Turner John Millar Irving's History 011 A large flat Island south of Inchconnachan. On the western point is situated an unfinished dwelling house surrounded by a small plantation of fir. (Sheet 10 trace 16). the name is a corruption of "Innis Moine". Peat or Moss Island. The inhabitants of the Village of Luss have the privilege of Obtaining fuel from this Island. The property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet]
OS1/9/12/10 Inchfad Inchfad Inchfad Inchfad Inchfad Inchfad Mr. Jolly, Factor John Millar Peter Turner Donald Watt New Stat Act [Statistical Account] 011 A name applied to a large Island in Loch Lomond. the property of the Duke of Montrose. rented by Duncan Mitchell, Blairvockie it contains a dwelling house, and offices, is arable with the exception of the western point. the whole skirted by a belt of natural wood. the name is a corruption of "Eilean Fada. Long Island.
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OS1/9/12/11 Church (Ruins of) Church (Ruins of) Mr. Jolly, Factor Peter Turner, Auchengavin Archibald Davie, Inchfad 011 A ruin about 60 feet long and 20 in breadth. Situated in the northern extremity of Inchcailloch, the walls are about 2 feet in height and the same in breadth, prior to the year 1621 it was used as a place of worship, (see description of Island Plan 14 trace 3). There is an Enclosed burying ground attached. Still used by families in the neighbourhood.
OS1/9/12/11 [Page] 11 County Dumbarton "The ancient parish comprised besides the isle of Inchcailyoch, most of the neighbouring islands, and a high mountainous tract on the eastern shores of the lake, including the ridge of Benlomond. In 1621, it was increased by the annexation of the forty pound lands of Buchanan, which were, by an act of Privy Council, disjoined from Luss. The ancient church of Inchcailyoch stood near the shore of the island and was in use subsequent to 1621. It was dedicated to Kentigerna, a holy widow, sister of St. Congan, and mother of St. Fillan." (Origines Parochiales) P. [Page] 32
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OS1/9/12/13 INCHGALBRAITH Inchgalbraith Inchgalbraith Inchgalbraith Inchgalbraith Inchgalbraith Montague Martin Esqr. Factor Peter Turner, Auchengavin John Millar, Luss Chalmers Caledonia Vol. [Volume] 3. Irving's History 013 A well known name applied to a Small Isle in Loch Lomond. Situated about 30 chains South East of Inchtavannach, in the centre of which is situated a Castle in Ruins. The property of Sir James Colquhoun Bart. [Baronet]. "Inchgalbraith has on it the ruins of an ancient Castle which are now the habitation of the Osprey".
OS1/9/12/13 CASTLE (Ruins of) [Inchgalbraith] Castle (Ruins of) Castle (Ruins of) Castle (Ruins of) Galbraith Castle Ruins Montague Martin Esqr. Peter Turner John Millar Johnston's Co [County] Map 013 This name is applied to a ruin situated in Inchgalbraith, is about 39 feet square the north, and half of the East walls are about 22 feet in height and 5 in breadth the remaining portions being about 6 feet high and 5 broad. the interior is filled with stones and rubbish, there is no records in connexion with this Castle to be found.
OS1/9/12/13 ELLANDERROCH Ellanderroch Ellanderroch Ellanderroch Ellanderroch Mr. Jolly, Factor to Duke of Montrose Archibald Davie, Inchfad Peter Turner County Map 013 A small Isle situated off the south west extremity of Inchfad. the name is a corruption of Eilean Darrach, Oak Island. the property of the Duke of Montrose.
OS1/9/12/13 [Page] 13 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Castle:] "Inchgalbraith has on it the ruins of an ancient castle which are now the habitation of the osprey." (Chalmer's Caledonia) [Below entry for Ellanderroch:] Eilean- an Island - Darach - an oak." (G.) [Gaelic]
OS1/9/12/14 Inchcailloch Inchcailloch Inchcailloch Inchcailloch Inchcailloch Inchcalliach Inch Caillach Inch Caillach Mr. Jolly, Factor John Millar Peter Turner New Statistical Account Irving's History County Map Chalmer's Caledonia 014 This name is applied to a large Island in Loch Lomond situated opposite Balmaha. it is of a ridge like shape. with three eminences or knolls. the east and west bear no name, the mid is called Tom na Nighinnan. the Island is about ¾ of a mile long and nearly a half broad, covered principally with copse wood intermixed with a few fir. "Buchanan was formerly called Inchcailloch ("Observe that the name is compounded here)", the name of an island in Loch Lomond where the Church was till 1621 when a considerable part of the Parish of Luss, at that time on this side of the Loch, was annexed to the Parish of Inchcailloch. Some years after the annexation the walls of the Church of Inchcailloch failing, and the people not finding it convenient every Sabbath especially in stormy weather, to be crossing over to the Island, worship was performed in a church near the house of Buchanan. See Name Sheet to the "Old Grave Yard authorized and described on 1/2500 work Trace 6. 14. 13, which was originally a Chapel of Ease to the Parish of Luss. From this Chapel which was called the Church or Chapel of Buchanan, the whole united Parish came by degrees to be called the Parish of Buchanan. Inchcailloch signifies the Island of Old Women, so called because in former times there was a Nunnery there." no remains of this nunnery exist now nor can the site be pointed out.
OS1/9/12/14 [Page] 14 County Dumbarton "Inch - an Island Cailleach - an old woman Cailleachas - dubh - a nunnery" (Gaelic)
OS1/9/12/15 CREINCH Crainch Crainch Crainch Creinch Creinch Mr Jolly. Factor Archibald Davie Peter Turner Chalmer's Caledonia New Stat Act. [Statistical Account] 014 A well known name applied to a Small Isle, covered with copse wood. Situated about 35 chains East of Inchmirrin, and the property of Lady Leith.
OS1/9/12/15 ABER ISLE Aber Isle Aber Isle Aber Isle Aber Island Mr. Jolly Archibald Davie Peter Turner County Map 014 A small Islet, covered with natural wood, situated about a mile south of Inchcailloch. The property of the Duke of Montrose.
OS1/9/12/15 INCHMURRIN Inchmirrin Inchmirrin Inchmirrin Inchmurren Inch-murin Inch Murren Inchmurin Inchmurin Mr Jolly Factor John Millar Peter Turner Irving's History Chalmer's Caledonia County Map New Stat. Act [Statistical Account] Old Stat. Act [Statistical Account] 014 This name is applied to the Southern and largest Island in Loch Lomond. It is almost covered with fine natural wood, having an opening along the ridge of the Isle, which is of a ridge like shape, with two eminences the Eastern of considerable height is called Tom Bay and the western Black Hill. On the north west point is situated the ruins of Lennox Castle, near to which is situated a superior dwelling house occupied by the Gamekeeper. It is used by the proprietor as a deer forest, is extensive, and the property of the Duke of Montrose. "A chapel still known as St. Mirren's Chapel stands now in ruins upon Inchmuryn the largest Island of Loch Lomond" - (Orig. Par. [Origines Parochiales] Scotiae. V. [Volume] 1. P [Page] 35 - )
OS1/9/12/15 [Page] 15 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Creinch:] [Beside Mr Jolly Factor] for Creinch JB "Crain - a sow" - (G [Gaelic]) Cre - keel of a ship [Below entry for Inchmurrin:] [Beside Mr Jolly Factor] for "Inchmirran" from the Estate JB "Inch - an island Muran - Sea reed Mìrean - A little piece" (G) [Gaelic] Mur - A fortified place..............................} I apprehend the name to be Murean - fortified places (G) [Gaelic].......} descriptive of the old ruins on the Island JB Inchmuryn Origines Parochiales Scotiae
OS1/9/12/16 TOM NA NIGHEANAN Tom na Nigheanan Tom na Nigheanan Tom na Nigheanan Mr. Jolly, Factor Archibald Davie, Inchfad Peter Turner, Auchengavin 014 This name is applied to an Eminence covered with fir. Situated about the centre of Inchcailloch, and signifies the Maidens' Knoll.
OS1/9/12/16 CLAIRINCH Clairinch Clairinch Clairinch Clairinch Clairinch Mr. Jolly Archibald Davie Peter Turner County Map Chalmer's Caledonia 014 A small Isle covered with copse wood situated about 10 chains south of Inchcailloch. The property of the Duke of Montrose.
OS1/9/12/16 TORRINCH Torrinch Torrinch Torrinch Torrinch Torinch Mr Jolly Archibald Davie Peter Turner County Map Chalmer's Caledonia 014 A name applied to an Isle planted with fir. with a quantity of Copse wood intermixed, & situated about 7 chains west of Inchcailloch. The property of Lady Leith.
OS1/9/12/16 [Page] 16 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Tom na Nigheanan:] Gen sing. [genitive singular] Nighinn, Gen. plu. [Genitive plural] and nom plu. [nominative plural] Nigheanan Tom nan Nigheanan "The maidens' Knoll" or Tom na nigheanan The knoll of the little maiden." [Below entry for Torrinch:] "Torr - a hill or mound" (G.) [Gaelic]
OS1/9/12/17 CHAPEL (Site of) [Inchmurrin] Burying Ground (Remains of) Burying Ground (Remains of) Burying Ground (Remains of) William Jolly Esqr. Factor John Miller, Luss J. McIntyre, Forrester 014 A small piece of ground near the centre of Inchmurrin supposed to have been used, when St Mirren's Chapel stood on the Island, as a burying ground. There are now no traces of any building, nor does any person in the neighbourhood recollect seeing any.
OS1/9/12/17 [Page] 17 Stirlingshire -- Ph [Parish] of Buchanan "A chapel, still known as St. Mirren's Chapel, marking, by the name of its patron saint, some old connexion with the Abbey of Paisley, - stands now in ruins upon Inchmuryn, the largest island of Loch Lomond, and is probably of much older date than the Castle erected there by the Earls of Lennox". Origines Parochiales I think this is evidently the site of the old Chapel referred to in the Origines Parochiales Scotiae. JB
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OS1/9/12/19 CASTLE Lennox Castle (Ruins of) Lennox Castle (Ruins of) Lennox Castle (Ruins of) Lennox Castle (Ruins of) Mr. Jolly, Factor Archibald Davie, Inchfad Peter Turner, Auchengavin John Millar, Luss 014 A ruin situated on a small Eminence on the south west point of Inchmirrin. It is about 63 feet in length, and 33 in breadth, the west portion of the north wall is about 18 feet high, and 5 broad, the south about 20 ft high and 6 in breadth. the gables are about 3 ft in height and 4 thick, at the western gable are two detached pieces of masonry. there is no records as to its date when built or destroyed.
OS1/9/12/19 TOM BAY Tom Bay Tom Bay Tom Bay Mr. Jolly Walter McGregor. Gamekeeper Archibald Davie 014 A name applied to the highest portion of Inchmirrin on which is a wooden house used as a watch booth.
OS1/9/12/19 [Page] 19 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Castle:] I see no sufficient authority for the prefix "Lennox" JB "The Castle of Balloch was "abandoned before the close of "the 14th Century for that which "had been newly erected on "Inchmuryn by the old "Earls of Lennox." Orig. Par. Scot. [Origines Parochiales Scotiae] Vol [Volume] 1 P [Page] 35 "At its southwest end in a grove of venerable oaks, are the ruins of an ancient Castle, once the residence of the Earls, and afterwards of the Dukes of Lennox" ( Full. Gazr. [Fullerton's Gazetteer]) "A portion of those lands which belonged to the Earl of Lennox, seem to have remained in the possession of his family for we find that the Countess Isabella on being released from Tantallon, took up her residence on the Island of Inchmurren, Loch Lomond. ( about 1450) (Irvings History.) [Below entry for Tom Bay:] Tom Beith The pronunciation of Tom Bay is so nearly like Tom Beith That there is reason to infer that the latter is the proper orthography.
OS1/9/12/20 DUN SHEOCK Dun Sheock Dun Sheock Dun Sheock Mr Jolly Archibald Davie Walter McGregor 014 A name applied to a small knoll or eminence in Inchmirrin, situated about 10 chains west of Tom Bay.
OS1/9/12/20 BLACK HILL Black Hill Black Hill Black Hill Mr Jolly Archibald Davie Walter McGregor 014 A rocky eminence situated in the west of Inchmirrin.
OS1/9/12/20 [Page] 20 County Dumbarton [Below entry for Dun Sheock:] "Dun - a hillock - Seoc - a plume" - (G) [Gaelic] The Gaelic pronunciation of the word Seoic, is so nearly alike the Anglicised word Sheock that substituting the former for the latter will not alter the pronunciation of the name and as the first word of the name is Gaelic- The word Sheock ought also be spelled correctly. Dun is now Scotch. is anything Dunblane - Dunstable - Dunkirk etc etc etc Scotch English French JB
OS1/9/12/21 ROSS POINT Ross Point For description etc see Name Book of Buchannnnan Parish Coy. [County] Stirling
OS1/9/12/21 CAMAS AN LOSGAINN Camas an Losgainn For description etc see Name Book of Buchannnnan Parish Coy. [County] Stirling
OS1/9/12/21 RUDHA FHUAR A'CHOS Rudha Fhuar a' Chos For description etc see Name Book of Buchannnnan Parish Coy. [County] Stirling
OS1/9/12/21 ARROCHYMORE POINT Arrochymore Point For description etc see Name Book of Buchannnnan Parish Coy. [County] Stirling
OS1/9/12/21 STRATHCASHELL POINT Strathcashell Point For description etc see Name Book of Buchannnnan Parish Coy. [County] Stirling
OS1/9/12/21 [Page] 21 [Below entry for Camas an Losgainn:] Camas nan Losgann See remarks on parish of Buchanan [Below entry for Rudhe Fhuara a' Chos:] See remarks on parish of Buchanan [Signed] John Bayly Major RE [Royal Engineers]
OS1/9/12/22 LOCH LOMOND Loch Lomond Loch Lomond Loch Lomond Loch Lomond Loch Lomond New Stat: Acct: [Statistical Account] Fullarton's Gazetteer Chalmer's Caledonia County Map, - Dumbarton Old Stat: Acct [Statistical Account] 014 "This lake has received its present name Ben Lomond, which probably derives its appellation from the British Slumon, signifying 'A Beacon'. It is only from the 14th century that the lake has received its present name. Previously it was called Loch Leven, as appears from the chartularies of Lennox". "Loch Lomond, the Queen of Scottish lakes, is distant about 20 miles from Glasgow, and 6 from Dumbarton. It lies principally in Dumbartonshire, but Stirlingshire bounds a portion of its eastern shore, It is nearly 30 miles long, and at its southern end from 4 to 5 miles broad, at the middle, however, and towards the northern extremity, its breadth is greatly diminished, - in some places to less than a mile, The depth of the lake varies as much as its breadth; the southern portion seldom exceeding 60 feet, whilst north of Luss, it increases to 360 feet, Thirty islands of different sizes, are scattered over its surface, some of which rise to a considerable height, and most of the larger ones are finely wooded. [continued on page 23]
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OS1/9/12/23 LOCH LOMOND Continued [continued from page 22] "The lake lies completely imbedded amidst different ranges of hills, At the south end, the Kilpatrick hills terminate near Kilmaronock; on the western shore are the mountains of Luss and Arrochar; at the upper extremity tower the mountains of Glenfalloch; and on the eastern shore the great chain of the Grampians terminates in Benlomond, These ranges of hills are intersected by deep glens and numerous mountain streams which pour their waters into the lake. The rivulets of Fruin, Luss, Finlass, and Duglass, with many smaller streams, drain the highlands of Dumbartonshire; but the longest river which comes into Loch Lomond is the Endrick, which flows into the south-east corner of the loch," Numerous splendid mansions with their richly wooded grounds, are studded around the shores, at the bases of the hills, or the openings of the valleys, adding the beauties of cultivation and art to those of nature, but it is the inconceivable variety afforded by the numberless projecting headlands and receding bays, and by all the crowd of fairy islands which lie scattered over the surface of the lake, which forms the distinguishing charm of the whole, and presents an inexhaustible source of pleasure and delight to the cultivated tourist," Fullarton's Gazetteer.
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OS1/9/12/24 [Page] 24 OS1/9/12 COS. [COUNTIES] DUMBARTON & STIRLING LOCH LOMOND AND ITS ISLANDS
OS1/9/12/25 [Page] 25 INDEX Name -- Sheet -- Page Arrochy Point -- 11 -- 21 Aber Isle -- 14 -- 15 Bucinch -- 11 -- 9 Black Hill -- 14 -- 20 Creagan Dubha -- 10 -- 2 Clach a' Mhinisteir -- 10 -- 4 Camas an Losgainn -- 10 -- 21 Cnoc na Gobhair -- 11 -- 7 Ceardach -- 11 -- 9 Church (Ruins of) -- 11 -- 11 Castle (Ruins of) -- 13 -- 13 Creinch -- 14 -- 15 Clairinch -- 14 -- 16 Chapel (Site of) -- 14 -- 17 Castle (Ruins of) -- 14 -- 19 Dun Sheock -- 14 -- 20 Eilean Daraich -- 10 -- 2 Eilean na h aon Craoibhe -- 10 -- 2 Ellanderroch -- 14 -- 13 Floating Island -- 10 -- 1 Fraoch Eilean -- 10 -- 2 Inchconnachan -- 10 -- 1 Inchtavannach -- 10 -- 3 Inchlonaig -- 11 -- 7 Inchcruin -- 11 -- 9 Inchmoan -- 11 -- 10 Inchfad -- 11 -- 10 Inchgalbraith -- 13 -- 13 Inchcailloch -- 14 -- 14 Inchmurrin -- 14-- 15 Ruinn a' Fhraoich -- 10 -- 3 Rudha Fhuar a Chaos -- 10 -- 21 Ross Point -- 10 -- 21 Strathcashell Point -- 11 -- 21 Stot Isle -- 10 -- 5 Tom nan Clag -- 10 -- 4 The Straits -- 10 -- 4 Tom na Nighinnan -- 14 -- 16 Torrinch -- 14 -- 16 Tom Bay -- 14 -- 19