Ayrshire volume 02

Page List of names as written Various modes of spelling Authorities for spelling Situation Description remarks Continued entries/extra info Transcriber's notes
OS1/3/2/1 LITTLE CUMBRAY [now Buteshire] Lesser Cumbray Little Cumbrae Little Cumbrae Little Cumbrae Little Cumbra Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Little Cumbray Comray Litell Comeray Little Cambray Dawsons Abridged Stat [Statistical] Hist [History] of Scotland 1854 Robert Hunter Esqr. of Hunterston Chart of the Clyde by Cap. [Captain] Robinson R.N. [Royal Navy] 1846 George Johnston Esqr Factor to the Earl of Eglinton Johnston's Co. [County] Map New Stat Acct [Statistical Account] of Ayr Origines Parochiales Scotiae, a work containing proceedings of the Court of Lands and Ecclesiastical Courts on the plantation of Ph [Parish] Churches &c Chalmer's Caledonia 3rd Vol. [Volume] Page 561 Chambers Picture of Scotland Old Stat Acct [Statistical Account] Maitlands Hist [History] of Scotland Full [Fullarton's] Gazetteer of Scotland Lawsons Gazetter of Scotland Aitkens Hist [History] of Scotland Bradshaws Railway Guide Map Aitkens Map of Cunninghame Monro's Hist [History] of the Western Islands New Stat Acct [Statistical Account] for Buteshire The Archeology and Prehistoric Annuals of Scotland Paterson's Hist [History] of Ayrshire Tytler's Hist [History] of Scotland Registry of the priory-seal Rev [Reverend] Alexander Marshall, Millport 228 An Island in the Firth of Clyde, the surface of which is exceedingly irregular and rocky, but affords tolerably good pasture for sheep. In several places it appears to have been cultivated, as the distinct traces of ridges indicate; the only portion now in cultivation, and what may be called arable is, the gardens attached to the farm and Lighthouses. There is a chain of cliffs almost surrounding this island, some of which are of considerable height and nearly perpendicular. The rocks at high water mark, are not stratified, but in some places quite smooth and flat, in other places they present a very rugged and uneven surface. The whole island belongs to the Right Hon [Honorable], the Earl of Eglinton. It is in the Co. [County] of Bute, and Quoad sacra attached to the parish of W. [West] Kilbride Ayrshire and Quoad Civilia to the Ph. [Parish} of Ardrossan. It is held in lease by Mr Motion whose steading is in the East side beside the Old tower or Castle. (signed) John Byrne C. Asst [Civilian Assistant]
OS1/3/2/1 [Page] 1 Parish of Ardrossan This island, although in the Sheriffdom of Bute, forms part of the parish of Ardrossan Ayrshire. See documents relative thereto in last page of N. [Name] Book. [Initials below Little Cumbray] JB. Capt. RE [Captain Royal Engineers] [Arrow pointing to] Little Cumbray Island "The name Cumbray, Cambray, "Cimbray, or Cumbraes, is said "to be derived from the Gaelic, "and to imply a place of shelter "or refuge." Full [Fullarton's] Gazetteer. "The Greater or Big Cumbray, with that "of the Little Cumbray, form a distinct parish "in the Presbytery of Greenock, and Synod "of Glasgow and Ayr," Full [Fullarton's] Gazetteer. The Island of Little Cumbray lies about midway betwixt the southern part of the islands of Bute and the promontory of Portincross, in the parish of West Kilbride, distant from either about 3½ Miles. It is how- ever attached to the parish of W. [West] Kilbride only Quoad Sacra; Civilly and politically, it forms part of the shire of Bute the judicial seat of which is in the Burgh of Rothsay." New Stat Acct [Statistical Account] Ayr. Lesser Cumbray is [fam]ed for it's perpendicular cliffs rising to the height [of 800] ft in a succession of [terraces.] [Dawson's] Abridged [Stat Statistical] Hist [History] [of Scotland]
OS1/3/2/1 Map situation numbers have been corrected during 19th Century. The missing letters and words of the last quote were copied from the original source.
OS1/3/2/2 CAIRNS (Urns &c found here) [Little Cumbrae: now Buteshire] Cairns (Urns etc found here) Cairns (Urns etc found here) Cairns (Urns etc found here) White Cairns Robert Hunter Esqr Mr Motion George Johnston Esqr Johnston's Co. [County] Map 228 Three circular heaps of small stones, at the North end of the Little Cumbrae, which Messrs Hunter, Johnston, and Motion, states to have been the burial place of some Chieftains or Warriors in ancient times, and also it is the popular belief in the neighbourhood that a King was interred in one of them. The Earl of Eglinton had them opened and they were found to contain sepulchral urns, and fragments of Weapons of Warfare etc. (Signed) J. Byrne C. Asst [Civillian Assistant]
OS1/3/2/2 [Page] 2 "About 20 years ago, the late Earl of Eglinton caused to be openend "some tumuli on the north extremity of this Island, called "Sheanawilly Point; and in which were found sephulchral "urns and fragments of Military weapons, which were all "carried off to Eglinton Castle." New Stat Acct [Statistical Account]
OS1/3/2/2 Map situation numbers have been corrected during 19th Century.
OS1/3/2/3 SHANNIWILLY POINT Shanniwilly Point Shanniwilly Point Shanniwilly Point Shinny Willie Point Maggie Point R. Hunter Esq New Statl. [Statistical] Account Mr Motion Farmer Aitkens Map of Kilbride Chart of the Clyde &c (1846) 228 This name applies to the North end or Point of the Little Cumbrae, and amongst the Fishermen and others in Millport, it is known as "Maggie Point". they are however aware that "Shanniwilly" is the original and most correct name.
OS1/3/2/3 HORSE PORT Horse Port Horse Port Horse Port R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr Cassell. Millport 228 A very small port, or landing place at Shanniwilly Point. derivation unknown.
OS1/3/2/3 MAGGIE ROCK Maggie Rock Maggie Rock Maggie Rock Maggie Rock R. Hunter Esq Chart of the Clyde Mr Motion Chart 228 A rock at the west side of Horse Port, being nearly perpindicular, it almost forms High and Low Water Mark. J. Byrne c a [civilian assistant]
OS1/3/2/3 [Page] 3 Maggie, A miners term, or an abbre. [abbreviation] of Margaret Jamieson
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OS1/3/2/4 GULL ROCK Gull Rock Gull Rock Gull Rock R. Hunter Esq Mr Cassell, Millport Mr Motion 228 A Perpindicular Cliff at Shanniwilly Point, overlooking the Sea, where Sea Gulls nest. hence the name.
OS1/3/2/4 THE TAN The Tan The Tan The Tan R. Hunter Esq Mr Cassell, Millport Mr Motion 228 That portion of the Firth of Clyde between the two Cumbraes, it is also named "Cumbrae Pass" on the chart, but it is not known by any person in the neighbourhood by that name -
OS1/3/2/4 [Page] 4 [Signature at bottom of page] J. Byrne c a [civillian assistant]
OS1/3/2/4 Map situation numbers have been corrected during 19th Century.
OS1/3/2/5 ST VEY'S CHAPEL (Site of) (Remains of a) Chapel (Remains of a) Chapel (Remains of a) Chapel St. Vey's Chapel R. Hunter Esq Mr. Motion New Stat. Acct. [Statistical Account] Chalmers Caledonia 228 Nothing now remains of this ancient building, but the foundation, it stands nearly in the centre of the island. Mr. Hunter of Ardrossan and others say that there is no account respecting it more than the traditional belief that it was a Chapel, and of this Mr. Hunter seems doubtful -
OS1/3/2/5 [Page] 5 "In the island of Little Cumbray, which is in the shire of Bute, "but belongs to the parish of Kilbride, there was in former times, "a chapel dedicated to Saint Beye, a scotish virgin and Saint, "who is said to have died in 896 A.D. The ruins of this chapel "are still to be seen: It is called St. Vey's Chapel, the name "of the Saint having been thus changed, by the Scoto-Irish "construction of their speech, in which it is called Chaibal-Bhay, and pronounced "Chaibal-Vey, and this has been Englished to St. Vey's Chapel. Chalmers Caledonia Vol [Volume] 3, page 561-2 "There are yet to be seen, the ruins of a very ancient chapel or "place of worship, said to have been dedicated to St. Vey, who lies buried near it; "probably, it was a dependency of I. Colm Kill." Old Stat. Acct. [Statistical Account] The ruins of the Chapel and tomb of St. Vey, alluded to in the former Account, still remain. They are situated near the top of the hill, a little northward of the castle. The Chapel is 33 feet by 15 inside; the walls, very little of which are now standing, are about 3 feet [continued on page 6] J. Byrne ca [civilian assistant]
OS1/3/2/5 Map situation numbers have been corrected during 19th Century.
OS1/3/2/6 LIGHTHOUSE HILL Lighthouse Hill Lighthouse Hill Lighthouse Hill R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr Cassell 228 A rocky eminence bounded by cliffs, on the highest part of which stands the ruins of the Old Lighthouse.
OS1/3/2/6 ST VEY'S TOMB St. Vey's Tomb St. vey's Tomb St. Vey's Tomb R. Hunter New Stat. Acct. [Statistical Account] Mr Motion 228 A flat or horizontal flag said to be the grave or tomb of an abbot; Mr. Motion the farmer on the island also states that it is the popular belief that he was buried with his eclesiastical robes, and a gold chain about his neck, which has often been an inducement to persons (had they been permitted) to attempt opening the grave, to possess themselves of the supposed treasure.
OS1/3/2/6 [Page] 6 [continued from page 5] Continued from last page. "in thickness, but the mortar with which they have been "built seems to have been bad, and very sparingly used. In the "tomb, which is a little distance north of the Chapel, are two "flat stones, on one of which, now broken in two, are sculptured "some ornamental tracery, such as is usually to be seen on those "ancient monuments called Danish Stones, but no vestige of any "inscription is to be observed on any of them. This inclosure, "which is of a square form, and of very limited dimensions, "was originally surrounded by a stone wall, but of which "only the foundation now exists." &c New Stat. Acct. [Statistical Account] [Signature at bottom of page] J Byrne ca [civilian assistant]
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OS1/3/2/7 LONG BAY Long Bay Long Bay Long Bay Chart R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion 228 A small Bay at the north end of the Little Cumbrae.
OS1/3/2/7 HAWK CRAIG Hawk Craig Hawk Craig Hawk Craig Hauk Craig R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr McKell Chart 228 A low Craig on the shore at Long Bay: the top of all the rocks resembles a Hawk, when seen at a certain angle.
OS1/3/2/7 THE BOURTREES The Bourtrees The Bourtrees The Bourtrees The Bourtrees R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr McKell Mr Oliver 228 An almost impassable part of the coast being a steep precipice sloping down from a cliff to the waters edge, where it is interspersed with huge blocks of rock and Bourtree or Elder bushes, from which it takes its name.
OS1/3/2/7 [Page] 7 [signed] J.B Boortree, the shrub elder. Glossary to Burns's Poems
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OS1/3/2/8 WHISKY HOUSE Whisky House (Ruin) Whisky House (Ruin) Whisky House (Ruin) R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr McKell 228 The remains of a hut, consisting of two walls, the solid rock, answering the purpose of other two, formerly used for the illicit distillation of Whisky.
OS1/3/2/8 CRAB ROCK Crab Rock Crab Rock Crab Rock Crab Craig Chart R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Johnston's Co [County] Map 228 A half tide rock, beyond Low Water, situate in Steadholm Bay
OS1/3/2/8 CRAIG NABBIN Craig Nabbin Craig Nabbin Craig Nabbin Kidnabbin Kidnabbin Chart R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr Cassell - Millport Mr William Oliver - Millport 228 A rock at the landing place north of the Lighthouse
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OS1/3/2/9 LONG MIRE Long Mire Long Mire Long Mire Robert Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr McKell 228 A wet grassy hollow now partially drained, but bears rough pasture.
OS1/3/2/9 HILL OF HILLS Hill of Hills Hill of Hills Hill of Hills R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr Cassell 228 An eminence on the N. E. [North East] side of the Light House Hill, on the top of which are several small Knowes.
OS1/3/2/9 BALLACH-AN-TOM SLAP Balloch-an-tom Slap Balloch-an-tom Slap Balloch-an-tom Slap R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr W Oliver 228 A name, which appears to be Gaelic, applied to a chasm in a ridge of Cliffs on the east side of the Little Cumbrae.
OS1/3/2/9 [Page] 9 Ballach A narrow pass - Jamieson tom A hillock - Jamieson [Signature at bottom of page] J Byrne ca [civilian assistant]
OS1/3/2/9 Map situation numbers have been corrected during 19th Century.
OS1/3/2/10 MEADOW POINT Meadow Point Meadow Point Meadow Point R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr Cassell 228 A Rocky point on the east side of Little Cumbrae, named so from a meadow adjoining
OS1/3/2/10 BROAD ISLANDS [nr Little Cumbrae: now Buteshire] Broad Islands Broad Islands Broad Islands Broad Isle R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Chart Aitken's map of W. [West] Kilbride 228 Two bare rocky islands, of granite or granate, quite smooth, having a gentle slope from the Centre to the Sea. Immediately north is another rock of the same description, visible at ½ tide, it has no name The islanders &c, call these small Islands "The Braid Allans The other name is more correct.
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OS1/3/2/11 CUMBRAY LIGHTHOUSE Cumbrae Lighthouse Cumbrae Lighthouse Cumbrae Lighthouse Robert P. McKell (Keeper) R. Hunter Esq Chart of the Clyde 228 A stationary light with a very neat house and garden attached, for the use of the keeper. it is situated on that part of the Little Cumbrae known as "Cumbrae Elbow", on a piece of flat ground at the base of a lofty precipice and on the edge of another perpendicular Cliff, of considerable height, overlooking the Sea. It was erected by a company -- Mr Robert Pollock McKell is the Keeper. under the Comissioners of the Clyde Lighthouses -
OS1/3/2/11 CUMBRAY ELBOW Cumbrae Elbow Cumbrae Elbow Cumbrae Elbow R. Hunter Esq Chart of the Clyde Mr. Motion 228 A point on the west side of the Little Cumbrae, on which stands the Lighthouse.
OS1/3/2/11 KING'S CHAIR King's Chair King's Chair King's Chair King's Chair R. Hunter Esq Mr. McKell Mr. Motion Johnston's Co. [County] Map 228 A seat found in the rock near Low water mark; the rocks here are columnar basalt, one of which would appear to have been displaced, and forms a seat: it is well known by this name.
OS1/3/2/11 [Page] 11 [Signature at bottom of page] J Byrne CA [civillian assistant]
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OS1/3/2/12 STEADHOLM POINT Steadholm Point Steadholm Point Steadholm Point Steadholm Point R. Hunter Esq. Mr. R. P. McKell Mr. Motion Chart 228 A rocky point about ¼ of a mile South of the Lighthouse.
OS1/3/2/12 STEADHOLM BAY Steadholm Bay Steadholm Bay Steadholm Bay Steadholm Bay Chart R. Hunter Esq Mr. Motion 228 A small bay ¼ of a mile South of the Lighthouse.
OS1/3/2/12 STEADHOLM LANDING PLACE Steadholm Landing Place Steadholm Landing Place Steadholm Landing Place Steadholm Landing Place Mr. Mckell R. Hunter Esq Mr. Motion Mr. Oliver Millport 228 A landing place for small boats, in Steadholm Bay.
OS1/3/2/12 [Page] 12 [signed] J Byrne ca [civillian assistant]
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OS1/3/2/13 SOUTH GELLET South Gellet South Gellet South Gellet Robert Hunter Esqr. Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 This is the Southern part of the Channel which seperates the Rock on which the old Castle stands from the Island
OS1/3/2/13 TRAIL ISLE Trail Isle Trail Isle Trail Isle Robert Hunter Esqr. Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A barren rock about 8 chains SE [South East] of the old Castle it is always surrounded by water
OS1/3/2/13 BOYD'S PORT Boyds Port Boyds Port Boyds Port Robert Hunter Esqr. Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A spot where a person named Boyd who formerly lived on the island was in the habit of landing
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OS1/3/2/14 LYTHE ROCK Lythe Rock Lythe Rock Lythe Rock Robert Hunter Esqr. Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A rock about 52 Chains SW. [South West] of the old castle situated at low water mark. it is so called from Fish called 'Lythe' being taken near this rock
OS1/3/2/14 LOWER LONG MIRE Lower Long Mire Lower Long Mire Lower Long Mire Robert Hunter Esq. Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A narrow piece of rough land thro [through] which a drain now runs. it was formerly marshy.
OS1/3/2/14 THE OLD WIFE The Old Wife The Old Wife The Old Wife Robert Hunter Esqr. Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A rock about 14 Chains S. W. [South West] of the old Castle so called from its resemblance to the shape of an old woman when seen at a distance
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OS1/3/2/15 SOUTH QUAY South Quay South Quay South Quay Robert Hunter Esqr Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A landing place for small Boats in the South Gellet.
OS1/3/2/15 CRAVIES HOLE Cravies Hole Cravies Hole Cravies Hole Robert Hunter Esqr Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A small Rocky Inlet near the old Castle
OS1/3/2/15 NORTH GELLET North Gellet North Gellet North Gellet Robert Hunter Esqr Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 The norther part of a narrow channel situated at the east side of the Island and seperating it from the Rock on which the old Castle stands
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OS1/3/2/16 CRAIG MILLER Craig Miller Robert Hunter Esqr Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A precipice about 17 Chains NW [North-West] of The old Castle and extends to Balloch an tom slap
OS1/3/2/16 GREY ROCK Grey Rock Robert Hunter Esqr Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A large Rock about 90 links from High water on the edge of a Cart road about 14 Chains north of the old Castle.
OS1/3/2/16 NORTH QUAY North Quay Robert Hunter Esqr Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 This is a landing place for Small Boats in the North Gellet
OS1/3/2/16 [Page] 16 Little Cumbrae
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OS1/3/2/17 CASTLE (In Ruins) [Castle Island; nr Little Cumbrae: now Buteshire] Castle (In Ruins) Castle (In Ruins) Castle (In Ruins) Castle Robert Hunter Esq Hunterston Duncan McLaren teacher, Cumbray Full [Fullarton's] Gazzetteer of Scotland P.283 Vol 1 popularly called 006 The ruins of an ancient square Tower situated on a Rocky island on the east side of Little Cumbrae. Mention is made of this Tower, in Fullarton's Gazzetteer as follows - "Upon the south side (of the Island) are a few dwelling houses and an old Square tower, which is situated directly opposite to another of the same kind on the mainland. Concering the antiquity of this Castle nothing can now be learned; and no date or inscription from which it might be ascertained, has ever been discovered. It seems to have been a place of some strength, and is surrounded by a rampart and a fosse, over which there has been a drawbridge: it was surprised an burned by the troops of Oliver Cromwell." At the present time there is an appearance of a rampart, the foss mentioned above must be the channel which seperates it from the large island, and called North and South Gellet - and as for the Draw Bridge, there is no trace of it, and no apparent use for it. The channel being quite dry, except at high water. Sand, may have accumulated here since the period the Castle was fortified, owing to the action of the tides. I could meet with no one who was acquainted with the existence of the Fosse & Drawbridge mentioned above. J B[yrne]
OS1/3/2/17 [Page] 17 On an islet rock on its east side, near the middle of the island, stands an ancient square tower, the wall of which are still nearly entire. It is about 35 feet in height, embattled. The area inside is 28 feet by 15, the walls being 6 in thickness; and as usual the first story is vaulted over with stone arches. During Cromwells visit to Scotland, Prinicipal Baillie alludes to his having retired to this fortlet for some time. etc New Stat Acct [Statistical Account]
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OS1/3/2/18 FIRTH OF CLYDE Firth of Clyde Firth of Clyde Firth of Clyde Firth of Clyde Firth of Clyde Firth of Clyde Firth of Clyde Frith of Clyde Frith of Clyde Map attached to the Scottish Directory Map attached to the New Stat Acct [Statistical Account] William Stewart Esqr St Fillans Ph [Parish] Largs George Johnston Esqr Redburn Ph [Parish] Largs Robert Steel Esqr Knock Castle Ph [Parish] Largs Oliver & Boyds Almanac Paterson's History of Ayr Full [Fullarton] Gazetteer Chalmers Calidonia An estuary or arm of the sea, branching inland from the North Channel, as far as the town of Greenock where the River Clyde throws off the character of the mere River or fresh water stream.
OS1/3/2/18 CASTLE ISLAND [nr Little Cumbrae: now Buteshire] Castle Island Castle Island Mr William Motion Little Cumbray Johnston's Co [County] Map 228 A rock island on the East side of the Little Cumbray, on which stand the ruins an old Castle
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OS1/3/2/19 TOM'S LOCH Tom's Loch Tom's Loch Tom's Loch Robert Hunter Esqr William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A shallow pool of water about 15 Chains west of the old Castle
OS1/3/2/19 CULLINS LOCH Cullins Loch Cullins Loch Cullins Loch Robert Hunter Esqr William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A piece of Flat rough pasture ground formerly flooded but now drained.
OS1/3/2/19 REST AND BE THANKFUL Rest and be thankful Rest and be thankful Rest and be thankful Robert Hunter Esqr William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 This name is given to a rock situated about 18 Chains from the old lighthouse in a south easterly direction. The foot road leading from the lighthouse to the easter shore, passes near it, it bears some resemblance to a great Arm Chair.
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OS1/3/2/20 PIPER HOLES Piper Holes Piper Holes Robert Hunter Esqr Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 Four Shallow muddy Pools situated about 20 Chains SE [South East] of the old Lighthouse.
OS1/3/2/20 LIGHTHOUSE BOG Lighthouse Bog Lighthouse Bog Robert Hunter Esqr Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A piece of flat rough pasture ground about 10 Chains from the old lighthouse in a Southern direction
OS1/3/2/20 OLD LIGHTHOUSE WELL Old Lighthouse Well Old Lighthouse Well Old Lighthouse Well Robert Hunter Esqr Hunterston William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 A good spring well about 7 Chains S. W. [South West] of the old Lighthouse.
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OS1/3/2/21 THE WHISTLING STONE The Whistling Stone The Whistling Stone The Whistling Stone Robert Hunter Esqr William Motion Little Cumbrae Charles Castle Millport 228 This name is given to a Rock situated in a Cliff about 12 Chains NW [North West] of the old Lighthouse, on a point of Lighthouse Hill, very much exposed to the south and west winds which in Rough weather enter crevices in the rock and cause a whistling sound
OS1/3/2/21 THE CLACH The Clach The Clach The Clach Mr D McLaren Teacher Millport Mr James Morris Millport Mr Hunter Hunterston 216 A large rock in Millport Bay covered at high Water
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OS1/3/2/23 FINNIE'S BOG Finnie's Bog Finnie's Bog Finnie's Bog Mr McKell Lighthouse Keeper Mr Motion Little Cumbrae Mr D. McLaren Millport 228 A flat piece of rough pasture land, formerly marshy, but now drained
OS1/3/2/23 OLD LIGHTHOUSE (In Ruins) Old Lighthouse (Ruins of) Old Lighthouse (Ruins of) Old Lighthouse (Ruins of) Old Lighthouse (Ruins of) Old Lighthouse (Ruins of) Mr McKell Mr Motion Mr McLaren Johnston's Co [County] Map Patersons History of Ayr 228 A circular tower situates on the highest part of the Little Cumbrae, now in ruins. This was the second lighthouse erected in Scotland, and was built about the year 1750, it was lighted by a coal fire There is now a new lighthouse on the west side of the island built in 1826, which is lighted with 15 oil lamps & silver reflectors
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OS1/3/2/25 BURIAL GROUND Burial Ground Burial Ground Burial Ground Tomb Burying Ground R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr Cassell Millport Chart of the Clyde Aitkens Map of Kilbride 228 A small enclosure on the summit of a Cliff, overlooking the Sea, wherein are deposited the remains of a male and female, children of residents on the island. It may be worthy of remark, as a reason why this peculiar spot should have been selected as a place of interment. The female, who was first buried here, was afflicted for some time previous to her death with a lingering illness and used frequently to retire to this secluded place: She became at length so attached to it that she wished to be laid there after her death.
OS1/3/2/25 STAR HOLE Star Hole Star Hole Star Hole Robert Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr Cassell 228 A hollow, at the south end of the Little Cumbrae: deriving its name from a description of grass, of that name, growing there. (Mr Motion)
OS1/3/2/25 [Page] 25 "A Son and successor of the historian Wodrow in the parish of Eastwood, "spent his latter days in this sequestered island, where he died, and "was interned in a tomb, which had sometime before been con- "-structed for the sepulture of one of his daughters, who had "died here in early life of consumption. This romantic burial-place "is situated on the brink of a high precipice, overlooking the ocean "near the South West corner of the island; a spot to which it is "said the young lady during her illness had become peculiarly attached, and where before her death, "as stated on her tombstone, she requested the right to be laid". New Stat Acct [Statistical Account] [Signature at bottom of page] J Byrne CA [Civilian Assistant]
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OS1/3/2/26 WATERLOO POINT Waterloo Point Waterloo Point Waterloo Point R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr McKell Lighthouse Keeper 228 A ledge of rocks, between the high & low water marks, where a vessel named the "Waterloo" was wrecked
OS1/3/2/26 WATERLOO BAY Waterloo Bay Waterloo Bay Waterloo Bay R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr McKell 228 A Small Bay situate at the S W [South West] part of the Little Cumbray
OS1/3/2/26 WATERLOO CAVE Waterloo Cave Waterloo Cave Waterloo Cave Waterloo Cave R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Mr McKell Mr Cassell (Millport) 228 The largest of the three Caves in the Little Cumbray, it consists of a chamber of about 30 x 30 links, with a pretty wide entrance. Here it is said (by the persons quoted) that the shipwrecked crew of the "Waterloo" took refuge for a time; and since then has borne the name
OS1/3/2/26 [Page] 26 [Signed] J Byrne
OS1/3/2/26 Map situation numbers have been corrected during 19th Century.
OS1/3/2/27 GULL ROCK Gull Rock Gull Rock Gull Rock R. Hunter Esq Chart of the Clyde Mr Motion 228 A low rugged rock, covered at high water, situated at the South end of the Little Cumbray.
OS1/3/2/27 GULL POINT Gull Point Gull Point Gull Point R. Hunter Esq Chart of the Clyde Mr Motion 228 The Southernmost point of the Little Cumbray
OS1/3/2/27 BOLL'S ROCK Boll's Rock Boll's Rock Boll's Rock Boll's Rock R. Hunter Esq Mr Motion Aitkens Map of West Kilbride William Oliver Millport 228 A well known Sunk Rock, visible at low water, beyond low water mark, at Gull Point
OS1/3/2/27 [Page] 27 [Signature at bottom of page] J Byrne ca [civillian assistant]
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OS1/3/2/28 GULL CRAIG Gull Craig Gull Craig Gull Craig R. Hunter Esq Chart of the Clyde Mr Motion 228 A high Cliff at the S.W. [South West] end of the Little Cumbrae frequented by Gulls
OS1/3/2/28 KING'S CAVE Kings Cave Kings Cave Kings Cave R. Hunter Esq Chart of the Clyde Mr Motion 228 A fissure in a Cliff at the south east end of the Little Cumbrae: A few yards from this, is another aperture in the face of the cliff: which is suppo[sed] to extend a great way into the earth. There is a tradition that a "Piper" entered this Cave, and that his music was heard for a considerable time; but went so far that the notes of his pipes could be heard at Garroch Head, in Bute. there is no account of his having ever returned, to relate his subterranean adventure.
OS1/3/2/28 [Page] 28 "The Caves formerly alluded to are mere fissures "in the Rocks. They all occur low down, and "near the South end of the island, where the "stratification is more distinct and columnar. "The largest of them, which is on the east "side, is dignified with the name of Kings Cave; "and in the tales of the place, is said to com- "-municate, by a submarine passage, with "the opposite island of Bute - such have ever been the speculations of credulity and unguided fancy." New Stat Acct [Statistical Account] [Signature at bottom of page] J Byrne ca [civillian assistant]
OS1/3/2/28 Map situation numbers have been corrected during 19th Century.
OS1/3/2/29 [Page] 29 Manse, Cumbray by Greenock 22d Nov 1855 Sir, I have received yours of the 20th. In answer I beg to state that the Little Cumbray while along with the Large Cumbray, is politically attached [continued on page 30]
OS1/3/2/30 [Page] 30 [continued from page 29] to the County of Bute, yet does not form a part of the Parish of Cumbray. The Large Cumbray is a separate & distinct Parish- The Lesser Cumbray is Quoad Sacra attac[hed] to West Kilbride - & yet at one time - if not even now - it had a connection [continued on page 31]
OS1/3/2/31 [Page] 31 [continued from page 30] with the Parish of Saltcoats. The Minister of this Parish will I doubt not be happy to give you the necessary information. It is a most anomalous little Island but yet it must be noticed that at the last "Census", it was, connected with this Island, - [continued on page 32]
OS1/3/2/32 [Page] 32 [continued from page 31] that with W. [West] Kilbride or Saltcoats. I would recommend you to communicate with the Minister of Saltcoats. In my opinion the most popular & correct mode of spelling is - Cumbray. I am Sir Yours truly Alexander Macleod
OS1/3/2/33 [Page] 33 Rothesay 29 Nov [November] 1855 My Dear Sir The fog which obliged you to write your note by candle light accom- panied it in its course down the river, and in consequence it did not arrive here till late yesterday afternoon. There is no doubt that the Little Cumbrae belongs to the Sheriffdom of [continued on page 34]
OS1/3/2/34 [Page] 34 [continued from page 33] of Buteshire, and that it is parochially connected with or further a part of the Parish called Kilbride in Ayrshire. Parishes are ecclesiastical districts and very frequently do not coincide with Sheriffdoms which are judicial and politi- cal jurisdictions. The Sheriffs office accordingly is not the repository of [continued on page 35]
OS1/3/2/35 [Page] 35 [continued from page 34] the writs respecting the parochial divisions. Such writs are most likely to be found either at the head quarters of the parish itself or in the Repositories in Edinburgh connected with the Court of Teinds. There are no papers here regarding the Little Cumbrae that I am aware of, and I think the Minister of the Big Cumbrae is [continued on page 36]
OS1/3/2/36 [Page] 36 [continued from page 35] right in advising you, to apply for specific in- formation to the Minister of the Parish to which the little Island belongs. I was not aware that it had been at one time part of Saltcoats Parish. You might ap- ply to the Minister of that parish also, but probably the Kilbride Minister will be able to give the most [continued on page 37]
OS1/3/2/37 [Page] 37 [continued from page 36] authentic information of the date and the Cause of its becoming part of the parish in which it is now included. The minister of the big Island is I suspect, wrong in the spelling of the name. I have with me at present a M.S [Manuscript] history of this Island compiled by a late antiquary, which [continued on page 38]
OS1/3/2/38 [Page] 38 [continued from page 37] states that the name Cumbra comes from the Cimbric or Welshmen who first peopled the Islands some six hundred years before Christ, and that the name of the Island is composed of their own designation and the letter a, which in their language viz infers Islands. Hence he maintains that Cumbra [continued on page 39]
OS1/3/2/39 [Page] 39 [continued from page 38) is the proper spelling. You however will I dare say prefer the fashion of this day. The fog yesterday was thick here beyond all example within my expe- rience. It was a true easterly haar, and will likely be followed by a general Catarrh. Excuse the rhyme which came of its own accord. We expect to be in Glasgow [continued on page 40]
OS1/3/2/40 [Page] 40 [continued from page 39] for a few days in a few weeks. It is an annual visit which makes a pleasant break of the winter. Give my love to Jane in which my sister joins and she also sends her best regards to you I am My Dear Sir yours very sincerely [A C Dick]
OS1/3/2/41 [Page] 41 Rothesay Decb. [December] 4th 1855 My Dear Sir I return you the Ministers letter and will bring with me the M.S [Manuscript] - history of Buteshire. The Little Cumbray is, I begin to suspect among the few places that are extraparochial. Your impressions respect ing our parochial Law are not quite correct. The Court of Teinds [continued on page 42]
OS1/3/2/42 [Page] 42 [continued from page 41] alone has power to form parishes in Scotland. Ordinarily the district is a parish both quoad sacra and quoad civilia but sometimes a district is united to one parish quoad sacra, and to an- other quoad civilia. The words quoad civilia in parochial Law mean the right to the Teinds and other rights and burdens (parochial) of a civil nature, such as poors rates, schoolmaster [continued on page 43]
OS1/3/2/43 [Page] 43 [continued from page 42] salary etc. The words quoad sacra imply strictly ecclesiastical rights and obligations. There are many districts in this country of which the parochial jurisdiction is thus divided, the quoad sacra being vested in one parish, and the quoad civilia in another. My conjecture is, that while the Little Cumbray has been annexed to Kilbride quoad sacra either by usage or decree of the Court of Teinds, it is quoad civilia either wholly extraparochial [continued on page 44]
OS1/3/2/44 [Page] 44 [continued from page 43] or attached to the parish of Saltcoats. I daresay the Factor of the Earl of Eglintoun could give you information on this point. To what Minister does it pay Teinds, and to whose parish does it pay poors rates. I suspect however that the best plan is to act upon what is undoubt- edly the common belief namely that it is a portion of Kilbride parish. It seems quite certain that it belongs to no parish in Buteshire. Love to Jane yours sincerely [A C Dick]
OS1/3/2/45 [Page] 45 The Manse West Kilbride 18th Decr [December] 1855. Dear Sir Yours in reference to the island of Little Cumbrae I duly received, I deferred writing you, till I should, if possible, get some definite information on the subject. The current opinion here was, that at a period somewhat remote the farm of Boydstone lying between this & Ardrossan was by an "act of Excambion" annexed to W [West] Kilbride "quoad civilia" & "quoad sa- cra" to Ardrossan; while the Little Cum- brae was annexed to Ardrossan "quoad civilia" & to W.Kilbride "quoad sacra" From the inquiries which I have made this does not appear ever to have been effected by a Legal Excambion: but probably was an arrangement among the parties interested for their mutual [continued on page 46]
OS1/3/2/46 [Page] 46 [continued from page 45] convenience. At the division of the Parish Church here in the year 1818 consequent on an addition being made to it I find from the Records of the Heritors, that the sheriff regarded the arrangement above referred to, as Legal & valid, & divided the church accordingly. The Little Cumbrae then belongs to the parish "quoad sacra" & to Ardrossan "quoad civilia". The precise date when this took place I cannot ascertain - probably upwards of 40 years ago. The cause is supposed to have been for the greater convenience of parties attending church. It belongs civilly and politically to the County of Bute & pays Ministers stipend & poor rates to the parish of Ardrossan: but not, as far as I can learn, any other public burden. Such are the only facts which I can gather on the subject. You well describe it when you call it an anomaly [continued on page 47]
OS1/3/2/47 [Page] 47 [continued from page 46] little island " I am Dear Sir Your obed.[obedient] & faithful servt. [servant] Alex King John Bayly Esqr Capt. Royl. Egrs. [Captain Royal Engineers] Gairdner [Esqr] Kilmarnock
OS1/3/2/48 [Page] 48 Ordnance Survey Office Glasgow 19th December 1855. Revd [Reverend] Sir In investigating for the purposes of the Government Survey the civil and political conditions of the island of Little Cumbray, I have been informed that by an act of Excambion (date and authority unknown) the farm of Boydstone became annexed to the Parish of West Kilbride Quoad Civilia and the Parish of Ardrossan quoad sacra, whilst the Little Cumbray was annexed to Ardrossan quoad civilia and to [continued on page 49]
OS1/3/2/49 [Page] 49 [continued from page 48] West Kilbride quoad sacra. It would seem to have been a very singular arrangement which should have detached quoad civilia the island from the Parish of which it naturally lay, and have attached it to a Parish from which the most part was several miles distant - The information I would request from you is whether you receive as Minister of the Parish of Ardrossan teinds from the island of Little Cumbray, and whether the other parochial rights and burdens of a civil nature, such as poors rates, schoolmaster's salary &c are paid by the island to the Parish of Ardrossan? [continued on page 50]
OS1/3/2/50 [Page] 50 [continued from page 49] I shall also feel obliged by any authentic information you are able to give in regard to the supposed Excambion mentioned - the cause or origin - date and authority - as well as by any further statement you may be good enough to afford me on this subject I am Sir Your obedient faithful Servant. John Bayly Capt. [Captain] Royl. [Royal] Engineers. The Revd. [Reverend] The Minister of the Parish of Ardrossan
OS1/3/2/51 [Page] 51 The Manse of Ardrossan 25th December 1855 The Island of Little Cumbray pays Minister's Stipend, Schoolmaster's Salary - and Poors rates - to the Parish of Ardrossan. beyond this I have little to add - I have searched the Teinds of the Presbytery of Irvine, and the Minute books of the Heritors of this Parish and in both have found the farm of Boydstone quoad civilia - attached to Ardrossan :- and in the Heritor's books, hints as to its being conveyed quoad civilia to West Kilbride - but I find in neither any allusion to an Excambion with Little Cumbray - nor indeed anything that could lead to the conclusion that the exchange
OS1/3/2/52 [Page] 52 OSI / 3 / 2 NAME BOOK (Parish of Ardrossan) (Isle of Little Cumbra(e)(y) Co. [County] Ayr
OS1/3/2/53 [Page] 53 Names of Objects -- Sheet -- Plan -- Pages Shanniwilly Point -- 228 -- 1 -- 3 St. Vey's Chapel (site of) -- 228 -- 5 -- 5 St. Vey's Tomb -- 228 -- 5 -- 6 Steadholm Point -- 228 -- 5 -- 12 Steadholm Bay -- 228 -- 5 -- 12 Steadholm Landing Place -- 228 -- 5 -- 12 South Gellet -- 228 -- 5 -- 13 South Quay -- 228 -- 5 -- 15 Star Hole -- 228 -- 9 -- 25 The Clach -- 216 -- 13 -- 21 The Lan -- 228 -- 1 -- 4 The Bourtrees -- 228 -- 5 -- 7 Trail Isle -- 228 -- 5 -- 13 The Old Wife -- 228 -- 5 -- 14 Tom's Loch -- 228 -- 5 -- 19 The Whistling Stone -- 228 -- 5 -- 21 Whisky House -- 228 -- 5 -- 8 Waterloo Point -- 228 -- 5 -- 26 Waterloo Bay -- 228 -- 5 -- 26 Waterloo Cave -- 228 -- 5 -- 26 Firth of Clyde -- various -- [various] -- 18
OS1/3/2/54 [Page] 54 INDEX Names of Objects -- Sheet -- Plan -- Page Burial Ground -- 228 -- 5 -- 25 Ballach-an-tom Slap -- 228 -- 1 -- 9 Broad Islands -- 228 -- 5 -- 10 Boyd's Port -- 228 -- 5 -- 13 Boll's Rock -- 228 -- 5 -- 27 Cairns -- 228 -- 1 -- 2 Crab Rock -- 228 -- 5 -- 8 Craig Nabbin -- 228 -- 5 -- 8 Cumbray Lighthouse -- 228 -- 5 -- 11 Cumbray Elbow -- 228 -- 5 -- 11 Cravie's Hole -- 228 -- 5 -- 15 Craig Miller -- 228 -- 5 -- 16 Castle (In Ruins) -- 228 -- 5 -- 17 Castle Island -- 228 -- 5 -- 18 Cullins Loch -- 228 -- 5 -- 19 Finnie's Bog -- 228 -- 1 -- 23 Gull Rock -- 228 -- 1 -- 4 Grey Rock -- 228 -- 5 -- 16 Gull Rock -- 228 -- 9 -- 27 Gull Point -- 228 -- 9 -- 27 Gull Craig -- 228 -- 5 & 9 -- 28 Horse Port -- 228 -- 1 -- 3 Hawk Craig -- 228 -- 1 -- 7 Hill of Hills -- 228 -- 1 -- 9 King's Chair -- 228 -- 5 -- 11 King's Cave -- 228 -- 5 -- 20 Little Cumbray -- 228 -- 5 -- 1 Lighthouse Hill -- 228 -- 5 -- 6 Long Bay -- 228 -- 1 -- 7 Long Mire -- 228 -- 5 -- 9 Lythe Rock -- 228 -- 9 -- 14 Lower Long Mire -- 228 -- 5 -- 14 Lighthouse Bog -- 228 -- 5 -- 20 Maggie Rock -- 228 -- 1 -- 3 Meadow Point -- 228 -- 1 -- 10 North Gellet -- 228 -- 5 -- 15 North Quay -- 228 -- 5 -- 16 Old Lighthouse Well -- 228 -- 5 -- 20 Old Lighthouse -- 228 -- 5 -- 23 Piper Holes -- 228 -- 5 -- 20 Rest and be thankful -- 228 -- 5 -- 19
OS1/3/2/55 [Page] 55
OS1/3/2/55 As this is a copy of a newspaper article, the page has not been transcribed.
OS1/3/2/55A [Page] 55A
OS1/3/2/55A As this is a copy of a newspaper article, the page has not been transcribed.
OS1/3/2/55B [Page] 55B From the Glasgow Herald of July 16th 1856. The writer has adopted Cumbrae as his orthography. but where Extracts are quoted, it is almost invariably Cumbray or Cumray J. B. Capt. R. E [Captain Royal Engineers]
OS1/3/2/55B The printed part of the page has not been transcribed.
OS1/3/2/56 [Page] 56 Cumbray decidedly JNSimpson Librarian Stirling Library
OS1/3/2/56 This brief note appears to be the last page of a memo with regard to the spelling of Cumbray as opposed to Cumbrae